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I am new To windows service. I need a windows service that reads an entry from a table from database. I have a CONSOLE APP where I add new project WINDOWS SERVICE. I already have a method that access the database, and other methods. I can put a thread on start that reads the database. Where do I put the thread? ( how can I do that). Where on WINDOWS SERVICE I add those methods? I have the Windows Service like this:

public Service1()
{
   InitializeComponent();
}

protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
{
   do
   {
      thread.start();
      bool variab = readFromDatabase (Database table);
   }
}

protected override void OnStop()
{
}
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3 Answers 3

I suggest that you create a class in which you do everything you need and create in in the service:

public Service1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
    {
        YourClass cl = new YourClass();
        cl.DoWhatYouNeed(...);       
    }

    protected override void OnStop()
    {
    }

This gives you opportunity to run and test your class separate from service, maybe during debug release.

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You must put your code or class, which contain data access logic in OnStart method

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With windows services usually a method is created to execute the main loop of the service, in a separated thread. Otherwise the service could become unresponsive. For example, you can have a method called MainLoop to execute the service logic. Use the OnStart method only to do the initializing tasks, such as read configuration values or start the threads of the service. And use the OnStop to executing cleaning tasks, stopping threads, etc...

Thread _workerThread;
bool _shouldStop;

public Service1()
{
  InitializeComponent();
}    

protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
{
   try{
   _workerThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(MainLoop));
   _shouldStop = false;
   _workerThread.Start();
   }
   catch{}
}

private void MainLoop()
{
   while (!_shouldStop)
   {
      try{
      //your logic here
      }
      catch{}
   }
}

protected override void OnStop()
{
   _shouldStop = true;
}
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Empty catch-blocks are (generally) evil. In the OnStart() method they are in particular. In your case the Service Control Manager will think your service has started, when it was possibly never able to start your "MainLoop". Maybe that it is, what you intended, but I would doubt that. –  Christian.K Sep 29 '11 at 8:53
    
They are empty because it is an example, and the purpose of the example is not exception handling. I was not writing an application here, just showing the purpose of each method. Regarding to the MainLoop, in the exception handling of the OnStart method will be decided whether to stop the service or not, so yes, it is intended. –  Alejandro Martin Sep 29 '11 at 9:03

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