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I'm trying to develop a mobile application, and I'm wondering the easiest way to convert an image into a text file, and then be able to recreate it later in memory said text. The image(s) in question will contain no more than 16 or so colors, so it would work out fine.

Basically, brute-forcing this solution would require me saving each individual's pixel color data into a file. However, this would result in a HUGE file. I know there's a better way - like, if there's a huge portion of the image that consists of the same color, breaking up the area into smaller squares and rectangles and saving their coordinates and size to file.

Here's an example. The image is supposed to be just black/white. The big color boxes represent theoretical 'data points' in the outputted text file. These boxes would really state their origin, size, and what color they should be.

E.g., top box has an origin of 0,0, a size of 359,48, and it represents the color black. Saved in a text file, the data would be 0,0,359,48,0.

sample algorithm output

What kind of algorithm would this be?

NOTE: The SDK that I am using cannot return a pixel's color from an X,Y coordinate. However, I can load external information into the program from a text file and manipulate it that way. This data that I need to export to a text file will be from a different utility that will have the capability to get a pixel's color from X,Y coordinates.

EDIT: Added a picture EDIT2: Added constraints

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PNG or GIF? You do not need to reinvent image compression :) –  Lasse Espeholt Sep 29 '11 at 8:10
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Could you elaborate on why you want to save an image (or its parts) as plain text? Can't you use a binary representation instead? Also, if images typically have lots of contiguous runs of pixels of same color, you may want to use the so-called run-length encoding (RLE). Alternatively, one of Lempel-Ziv-something compression algorithms could be used (LZ77, LZ78, LZW). –  Alexey Frunze Sep 29 '11 at 8:14
    
The problem isn't the image itself - it's the SDK I am using. There is no way that I can get a certain pixel's color from the image itself within the SDK. Thus, I need to come up with a solution that would convert said data to a text file that I could load up into the app and manipulate. –  Jeffrey Kern Sep 29 '11 at 8:30
    
These are restraints you'll have to explain in your question. As images are made to display them, getting a certain pixel's color is a very basic operation everybody will assume you can do. Also, "converting said data to a text file" is just the same, but for all pixels at once. It looks like you're trying to solve a problem you shouldn't have. –  schnaader Sep 29 '11 at 8:41
    
@Alex, you should post your comment as an answer because I developed a simple RLE for my problem - it works fine and solved it perfectly! Thank you. –  Jeffrey Kern Oct 1 '11 at 8:28
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Could you elaborate on why you want to save an image (or its parts) as plain text? Can't you use a binary representation instead? Also, if images typically have lots of contiguous runs of pixels of same color, you may want to use the so-called run-length encoding (RLE). Alternatively, one of Lempel-Ziv-something compression algorithms could be used (LZ77, LZ78, LZW).

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Compress the image into a compressed format (e.g. JPEG, PNG, GIF, etc) and then save it as a .txt file or whatever. To recreate the image, just read in the file into your program using whatever library function suits your particular needs.

If it's necessary that the .txt file have some textual meaning, then you may be in some trouble.

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In cs there is an algorithm like spatial index to recursivley subdivide a plane into 4 tiles. If the cell has the same size it looks like a quadtree. If want you to subdivide a plane into pattern (of colors) you can use this tiling idea to dynamically change the size of the cell. A good start to look at is a z-curve or a hilbert curve.

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