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I have a class that gets used in a client application and in a server application. In the server application, I add some functionality to the class trough extension methods. Works great. Now I want a bit more:

My class (B) inherits from another class (A).

I'd like to attach a virtual function to A (let's say Execute() ), and then implement that function in B. But only in the server. The Execute() method would need to do stuff that is only possible to do on the server, using types that only the server knows about.

There are many types that inherit from A just like B does, and I'd like to implement Execute() for each of them.

I was hoping I could add a virtual extension method to A, but that idea doesn't seem to fly. I'm looking for the most elegant way to solve this problem, with or without extension methods.

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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, there aren't such things as virtual extension methods. You could use overloading, but that doesn't support polymorphism. It sounds like you might want to look at something like dependency injection (etc) to have different code (dependencies) added in different environments - and use it in regular virtual methods:

class B {
     public B(ISomeUtility util) {
         // store util
     }
     public override void Execute() {
         if(util != null) util.Foo();
     }
}

Then use a DI framework to provide a server-specific ISomeUtility implementation to B at runtime. You can do the same thing with a central static registry (IOC, but no DI):

    override void Execute() {
        ISomeUtility util = Registry.Get<ISomeUtility>();
        if(util != null) util.Foo();
    }

(where you'd need to write Registry etc; plus on the server, register the ISomeUtility implementation)

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Thanks Marc. I'll implement something like this. It's a bit more tricky for me, as I serialize these classes, and send them over the wire from the server to the client and back. So traditional DI might be a bit tricky, but I guess I can implement a serverside equivalent of class B, (probably inheriting from B), and when the client sends the server an instance of B, I'll have to replace it with a new instance of ServerB. –  Lucas Apr 17 '09 at 8:38
    
The registry approach works OK with serialization. I use that approach to do assembly sharing with WCF objects... –  Marc Gravell Apr 17 '09 at 8:50
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You can use the new dynamic type functionality to avoid having to build a registry of types to methods:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using visitor.Extension;

namespace visitor
{
    namespace Extension
    {
        static class Extension
        {
            public static void RunVisitor(this IThing thing, IThingOperation thingOperation)
            {
                thingOperation.Visit((dynamic)thing);
            }

            public static ITransformedThing GetTransformedThing(this IThing thing, int arg)
            {
                var x = new GetTransformedThing {Arg = arg};
                thing.RunVisitor(x);
                return x.Result;
            }
        }
    }

    interface IThingOperation
    {
        void Visit(IThing iThing);
        void Visit(AThing aThing);
        void Visit(BThing bThing);
        void Visit(CThing cThing);
        void Visit(DThing dThing);
    }

    interface ITransformedThing { }

    class ATransformedThing : ITransformedThing { public ATransformedThing(AThing aThing, int arg) { } }
    class BTransformedThing : ITransformedThing { public BTransformedThing(BThing bThing, int arg) { } }
    class CTransformedThing : ITransformedThing { public CTransformedThing(CThing cThing, int arg) { } }
    class DTransformedThing : ITransformedThing { public DTransformedThing(DThing dThing, int arg) { } }

    class GetTransformedThing : IThingOperation
    {
        public int Arg { get; set; }

        public ITransformedThing Result { get; private set; }

        public void Visit(IThing iThing) { Result = null; }
        public void Visit(AThing aThing) { Result = new ATransformedThing(aThing, Arg); }
        public void Visit(BThing bThing) { Result = new BTransformedThing(bThing, Arg); }
        public void Visit(CThing cThing) { Result = new CTransformedThing(cThing, Arg); }
        public void Visit(DThing dThing) { Result = new DTransformedThing(dThing, Arg); }
    }

    interface IThing {}
    class Thing : IThing {}
    class AThing : Thing {}
    class BThing : Thing {}
    class CThing : Thing {}
    class DThing : Thing {}
    class EThing : Thing { }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var things = new List<IThing> { new AThing(), new BThing(), new CThing(), new DThing(), new EThing() };
            var transformedThings = things.Select(thing => thing.GetTransformedThing(4)).Where(transformedThing => transformedThing != null).ToList();
            foreach (var transformedThing in transformedThings)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(transformedThing.GetType().ToString());
            }
        }
    }
}
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you konw, i like this example but you could have put your point much much sipler. –  Tiju John May 22 '12 at 20:15
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I would suggest something like the following. This code could be improved by adding support for detecting intermediate class hierarchy types that don't have a dispatch mapping and calling the nearest dispatch method based on the runtime hierarchy. It could also be improved by using reflection to detect overload of ExecuteInteral() and adding them automatically to the dispatch map.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace LanguageTests2
{
    public class A { }

    public class B : A {}

    public class C : B {}

    public static class VirtualExtensionMethods
    {
        private static readonly IDictionary<Type,Action<A>> _dispatchMap 
            = new Dictionary<Type, Action<A>>();

        static VirtualExtensionMethods()
        {
            _dispatchMap[typeof(A)] = x => ExecuteInternal( (A)x );
            _dispatchMap[typeof(B)] = x => ExecuteInternal( (B)x );
            _dispatchMap[typeof(C)] = x => ExecuteInternal( (C)x );
        }

        public static void Execute( this A instance )
        {
            _dispatchMap[instance.GetType()]( instance );
        }

        private static void ExecuteInternal( A instance )
        {
            Console.WriteLine("\nCalled ToString() on: " + instance);
        }

        private static void ExecuteInternal(B instance)
        {
            Console.WriteLine( "\nCalled ToString() on: " + instance );
        }

        private static void ExecuteInternal(C instance)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("\nCalled ToString() on: " + instance);
        }
    }

    public class VirtualExtensionsTest
    {
        public static void Main()
        {
            var instanceA = new A();
            var instanceB = new B();
            var instanceC = new C();

            instanceA.Execute();
            instanceB.Execute();
            instanceC.Execute();
        }
    }
}
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Virtual implies inheritance in a OOP way and extension methods are "just" static methods that through a bit a syntactic sugar the compiler allows you to pretend to call on an instance of the type of its first parameter. So no, virtual extension methods are out of the question.

Check out the answer by Marc Gravell for a possible solution to your problem.

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You can implement a service register. Example (server side):

static IDictionary<Type, IService> serviceRegister;

public void ServerMethod(IBusinessType object)
{
  serviceRegister[obect.GetType()].Execute(object);
}

What you need are rather services in your server, which implement server side functionality, instead of extension methods. I wouldn't put to much logic into extension methods.

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Let me check: you have a class hierarchy inheriting from A, presumably structured according to your business domain. Then you want to add behaviours depending on where the classes execute. So far you've used extension methods, but now you find you cannot get them to vary with your class hierarchy. What kinds of behaviours are you attaching at the server?

If it's stuff like transaction management and security, policies implemented through dependency injection à la Marc's suggestion should work well. You could also consider implementing the Strategy pattern through delegates and lambdas, for a more limited version of DI. However, what's not clear is how client code currently uses your classes and their extension methods on the server. How dependent are other classes on how you add the server-side functionality? Are they server-side only classes that currently expect to find the extension methods?

In any case, it sounds like you're going to need a careful testability design and testing strategy since you are introducing variation along two simultaneous dimensions (inheritance hierarchy, execution environment). You are using unit testing, I trust? Check that whatever solution you choose (e.g. DI through configuration) interacts well with testing and mocking.

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