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I'm working on a web page where I'm making an AJAX call that returns a chunk of HTML like:

<div>
  <!-- some html -->
  <script type="text/javascript">
    /** some javascript */
  </script>
</div>

I'm inserting the whole thing into the DOM, but the JavaScript isn't being run. Is there a way to run it?

Some details: I can't control what's in the script block (so I can't change it to a function that could be called), I just need the whole block to be executed. I can't call eval on the response because the JavaScript is within a larger block of HTML. I could do some kind of regex to separate out the JavaScript and then call eval on it, but that's pretty yucky. Anyone know a better way?

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up vote 12 down vote accepted

Script added by setting the innerHTML property of an element doesn't get executed. Try creating a new div, setting its innerHTML, then adding this new div to the DOM. For example:

<html>
<head>
<script type='text/javascript'>
function addScript()
{
    var str = "<script>alert('i am here');<\/script>";
    var newdiv = document.createElement('div');
    newdiv.innerHTML = str;
    document.getElementById('target').appendChild(newdiv);
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<input type="button" value="add script" onclick="addScript()"/>
<div>hello world</div>
<div id="target"></div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
1  
This script does not work in IE 7. IE 7 seems to have a bug with the appendChild function. – Eddie Sep 26 '08 at 17:13
2  
Doesn't work, using google chrome 26. – prashn64 May 21 '13 at 17:47
2  
doesn't work on any modern browser (firefox, chrome, safari) – Roy Aug 5 '14 at 21:53

You don't have to use regex if you are using the response to fill a div or something. You can use getElementsByTagName.

div.innerHTML = response;
var scripts = div.getElementsByTagName('script');
for (var ix = 0; ix < scripts.length; ix++) {
    eval(scripts[ix].text);
}
share|improve this answer
4  
this seems highly vulnerable to injection attacks and other vectors... – Jonathan Day Jun 6 '13 at 3:40

An alternative is to not just dump the return from the Ajax call into the DOM using InnerHTML.

You can insert each node dynamically, and then the script will run.

Otherwise, the browser just assumes you are inserting a text node, and ignores the scripts.

Using Eval is rather evil, because it requires another instance of the Javascript VM to be fired up and JIT the passed string.

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6  
It would be very nice if you explain how to insert each node dynamically. – mandza Jun 4 '14 at 10:53

While the accepted answer from @Ed. does not work on current versions of Firefox, Google Chrome or Safari browsers I managed to adept his example in order to invoke dynamically added scripts.

The necessary changes are only in the way scripts are added to DOM. Instead of adding it as innerHTML the trick was to create a new script element and add the actual script content as innerHTML to the created element and then append the script element to the actual target.

<html>
<head>
<script type='text/javascript'>
function addScript()
{
    var newdiv = document.createElement('div');

    var p = document.createElement('p');
    p.innerHTML = "Dynamically added text";
    newdiv.appendChild(p);

    var script = document.createElement('script');
    script.innerHTML = "alert('i am here');";
    newdiv.appendChild(script);

    document.getElementById('target').appendChild(newdiv);
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<input type="button" value="add script" onclick="addScript()"/>
<div>hello world</div>
<div id="target"></div>
</body>
</html>

This works for me on Firefox 42, Google Chrome 48 and Safari 9.0.3

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I don't have the solution, but you may find what you're looking for here:

http://ajaxpatterns.org/On-Demand_Javascript

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The best method would probably be to identify and eval the contents of the script block directly via the DOM.

I would be careful though.. if you are implementing this to overcome a limitation of some off site call you are opening up a security hole.

Whatever you implement could be exploited for XSS.

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but the way I understand XSS vulnerabilities in this type of situations, it's only an issue if you're worried about someone being able to gain access to someone else's online account, and thus be able to steal sensitive info, but if it's not possible for users to login to the site then this isn't a worry. – Mr. Me Nov 30 '15 at 19:33

You can use one of the popular Ajax libraries that do this for you natively. I like Prototype. You can just add evalScripts:true as part of your Ajax call and it happens automagically.

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Below is a bit different approach which uses the fact that if tag contains type="text/xml" JavaScript inside will not execute:

function preventJS(html) {
    return html.replace(/<script(?=(\s|>))/i, '<script type="text/xml" ');
}

You can read more here - JavaScript: How to prevent execution of JavaScript within a html being added to the DOM. If it works for you, please leave here a comment with information which browser and version you have used.

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