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I have a strange problem. I have this structure:

<div id="content">
  <div id="one"></div>
  <div id="two"></div>
</div>

And in my css i have this:

#content {
  position: relative;
  background-image: url(content.png);
}
#content #one {
  position: absolute;
  background-image: url(one.png);
}
#content #two {
  position: absolute;
  background-image: url(two.png);
}

Problem is: All backgrounds are rendered at their position where I want them, only that the #content bg is above the #one and #two bg. But I want the #content bg below #one and #two. I already tried setting z-index's but this didn't work. Why is this and how do I fix it?

W3C Validator tells me that I have no errors in HTML and CSS. I tested with FF6 and FF7 and IE9.

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3  
There is no #page bg in the content you show? Can you show a live example in a JSFiddle for example? –  Pekka 웃 Sep 29 '11 at 8:17
    
The #page id also has two childs using float, can this be related to the problem? –  blubberbernd Sep 29 '11 at 8:27
    
What #page id? There is none in your code. –  Pekka 웃 Sep 29 '11 at 8:31
    
sorry, page=content.... will fix it –  blubberbernd Sep 29 '11 at 8:42
    
Ah. That's really weird - content's background should never overlap one and two. Are you 100% sure there is not other CSS affecting this? A live example would be great –  Pekka 웃 Sep 29 '11 at 8:45

3 Answers 3

not sure if you know but you must position each div relatively for z-index to work. Give that a go :)

myitem{
position:relative;
z-index:x;
}
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z-index does not seem to work on `position: static, which is the default for elements.
This is by design.
I'm sorry that I can't explain better.

You can test it in this page: http://tjkdesign.com/articles/z-index/teach_yourself_how_elements_stack.asp

You will have to use position: relative; on #page.

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This is the CSS code you posted slightly modified to show that DIVs 'one' and 'two' are on top of the 'content' and keep DIV 'one' from being under DIV 'two'...

<style type="text/css">
    #content
    {
        position: relative;
        background-image: url('images/banner10.jpg');
        height: 400px;
        width: 600px;
    }

    #content #one
    {
        position: absolute;
        background-image: url('images/flag.jpg');
        height: 200px;
        width: 400px;
        color: black;
        font-weight: bold;
        font-size: 100px;
    }

    #content #two
    {
        position: absolute;
        background-image: url('images/banner18.jpg');
        height: 200px;
        width: 400px;
        top: 200px;
        color: White;
        font-weight: bold;
        font-size: 100px;
    }
</style>

With this html:

<div id="content">
    <div id="one">ONE
    </div>
    <div id="two">TWO
    </div>
</div>

And this is what is looks like:

enter image description here

You are obviously not showing all of your CSS for the DIVS if you have a background issue... there must be some other code that is causing it because as you can see it works just fine. I tested this in every major modern browser and it looks exactly the same. It would help if you posted all of your CSS that relate to these DIV tags.

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