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I have in my code the concept of command :

public abstract class BaseCommand
{
    public BaseCommand() { this.CommandId = Guid.NewGuid(); this.State = CommandState.Ready; }
    public Guid CommandId { get; private set; }
    public CommandState State {get; private set; }
    protected abstract void OnExecute();
    public void Execute() {
         OnExecute();
         State = CommandState.Executed;
    }
}

And some concrete implementation like this one :

public class DeleteItemCommand
{
    public int ItemId {get; set;}
    protected override void OnExecute()
    {
        var if = AnyKindOfFactory.GetItemRepository();
        if.DeleteItem(ItemId);
    }
}    

Now I want to add some validation. The first thing I can do is add a if/throw check:

public class DeleteItemCommand
{
    public int ItemId {get; set;}
    protected override void Execute()
    {
        if(ItemId == default(int)) throw new VeryBadThingHappendException("ItemId is not set, cannot delete the void");
        var if = AnyKindOfFactory.GetItemRepository();
        if.DeleteItem(ItemId);
    }
}

Now, I'm trying to use Code Contracts, because I'm quite convinced of its usefulness to reduce bug risk. If I rewrote the method like this :

public class DeleteItemCommand
{
    public int ItemId {get; set;}
    public void Execute()
    {
        Contract.Requires<VeryBadThingHappendException>(ItemId != default(int));

        var if = AnyKindOfFactory.GetItemRepository();
        if.DeleteItem(ItemId);
    }
}

The method compiles, the check is done at run-time. However, I got warning :

warning CC1032: CodeContracts: Method 'MyProject.DeleteItemCommand.Execute' overrides 'MyProject.BaseCommand.Execute', thus cannot add Requires.

I understand this warning is issued because I'm breaking the Liskov Principle.

However, in my case, conditions are different from one concrete class to another. My BaseCommand class is actually defining some common attributes like CommandIdentifier, state, and other ultimate features I removed here to keep the question simple.

While I understand the concepts of this principle, I don't know what are the step I have to do to remove the warning properly (don't tell me about the #pragma warning remove).

  1. Should I stop using code contracts in this case, where concrete implementations have specific requirements ?
  2. Should I rewrite my commanding mechanism to have, for example, separation between the Command "arguments" and the Command "execution" ? (having one CommandeExecutor<TCommand> per concrete class). This would result in a lot more classes in my project.
  3. Any other suggestion ?
  4. [Edit] As suggested by adrianm, convert properties to readonly, add constructor parameters to populate the properties and check properties in the contructor
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"My BaseCommand is mainly only here to share common code" Could you not use composition rather than inheritance for this? –  vickirk Sep 29 '11 at 10:13
    
DeletedItemCommand has to be: public override void Execute() –  bitbonk Sep 29 '11 at 10:19
    
I should rephrase it "My BaseCommand class is actually defining some common attributes like CommandIdentifier, state, etc." –  Steve B Sep 29 '11 at 10:20
    
@bitbonk: you are right, question updated –  Steve B Sep 29 '11 at 10:21
1  
Why not make ItemId readonly and put the check in the constructor? Seems weird to have an override that depends on a mutable field being set. –  adrianm Sep 29 '11 at 10:45
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would use the constructor to set all the correct values, instead of public property setters.

public class DeleteItemCommand
{
    public DeleteItemCommand(int itemId)
    {
        Contract.Requires<VeryBadThingHappendException>(itemId!= default(int));
        ItemId = itemId;
    }

    public int ItemId {get; private set;}
    public void Execute()
    {   
        var if = AnyKindOfFactory.GetItemRepository();
        if.DeleteItem(ItemId);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In my case this will works. However, it will start to be a bit complicated when the execute method won't require all parameters populated in all cases (param2 required only if param1 == true). Note I can still use complex parameter in this case. –  Steve B Sep 30 '11 at 12:43
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I don't think you can use code contracts in this case. I think, you cannot add preconditions in overridden methods, only invariants and postconditions are possible there. Your best bet might be be to refactor from inheritance to composition:

ICommandExecutor
{
    Execute(BaseCommand source);
}

public abstract class BaseCommand
{
    public ICommandExecutor Executor { get; private set; }
    public void Execute() 
    {
        this.Executor.Execute(this);
        State = CommandState.Executed;
    }
}

public class DeleteCommandExecutor : ICommandExecutor
{
    public void Execute(BaseCommand source)
    {
        Contract.Requires<VeryBadThingHappendException>(source.ItemId != default(int));
        var if = AnyKindOfFactory.GetItemRepository();
        if.DeleteItem(source.ItemId);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Gosh, this makes code contracts way less usefull... An architecture like this is very very common and composition is something totally different. I have a similar case in which i have a client with the option of command scheduling, that is Client.ScheduleCommand(BaseCommand command); –  Polity Sep 29 '11 at 10:41
    
Yes you are right, it doesn't feel right to change the class design like that for the sole purpose of getting code contracts to work. But it seems that this is as good as it gets. –  bitbonk Sep 30 '11 at 8:08
1  
To me it feels exactly right to change the class design to get code contracts to work. This design is using inheritence for the wrong purpose, and composition is a more correct design. A program using these objects cannot call Execute on a variable of the abstract base class type, because it cannot be sure that the preconditions for Execute are satisfied (regardless of whether code contracts are used or not). Therefore, Execute can only be called on a variable of the derived type. Therefore, object inheritence does not model the system correctly, and it is the wrong mechanism to use here. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Sep 30 '11 at 19:05
    
The purpose of code contracts is to highlight logic errors of exactly this sort, and in this case it was completely successful. +1 for your recommendation to use composition. (Unfortunately, the proposed refactoring is no better, because a method that uses variable of the interface type will be equally as helpless at ensuring the preconditions as one that uses a variable of the abstract base class type.) –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Sep 30 '11 at 19:09
1  
The same problem exists inheriting from a base class or implementing an interface. Any method calling Execute(BaseCommand) on a variable of type ICommandExecutor cannot verify the preconditions of DeleteCommandExecutor or LaunchRocketExecutor or PinballPaddleFlipExecutor, simply because it has no idea what sort of preconditions the inheriting or implementing class may want to enforce (beyond what is already built into the interface or abstract base class). Modifying the preconditions on an overridden method would change that method's public signature—breaking substitution. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Oct 1 '11 at 4:23
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You could change the code to perform the execution in a different method:

public class DeleteItemCommand: BaseCommand
{
    public int ItemId {get; set;}
    public override void Execute()
    {
        PrivateExecute(ItemId);
    }

    private void PrivateExecute(int itemId)
    {
        Contract.Requires<VeryBadThingHappendException>(itemId != default(int));

        var rep = AnyKindOfFactory.GetItemRepository();
        rep.DeleteItem(itemId);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
doesn't this method will produce other warnings Requires unproven itemId != default(int) ? –  Steve B Sep 29 '11 at 11:22
    
Why should that warning occur? –  bitbonk Sep 29 '11 at 16:29
    
My knowledge about code contracts is limited but as far as i know, this isnt a solution since the requirements and expectations defined in the private method wont be exposed by the public method (right?). Meaning the static analyzer wont function correctly... (More of a question than a statement ;)) –  Polity Sep 30 '11 at 2:29
1  
@bitbonk: since PrivateExecute requires having an ItemId != default(int), callers to this methods should prove this. In this case, The Execute method has no clue that the ItemId value provided as arguments is != default(int). That's why such warning will occur. –  Steve B Sep 30 '11 at 7:43
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In this case the code contracts are directing your attention to a design error in your class structure, and you would be wise to heed this warning.

To see the problem, consider how the classes may be used.

protected void executeButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs args) 
{
    BaseCommand command = GetCurrenctlySelectedCommand();
    command.Execute();
}

If the variable command happens to hold an object of the type DeleteItemCommand, then that object has preconditions that must be met or an exception will be thrown. We would like to avoid this exception, so how can we verify that the precondition is met?

Unfortunately, there is no simple way to do this. We cannot reason about all the possible preconditions about every type of derived object that may inhabit that variable. In fact, that variable may contain a type of object that was not invented when this code was written. In fact, the type for that object may not even be in the accessibility domain of this method, if it was provided by a factory in another assembly.

Since there is no way to verify that preconditions are met for this object, we cannot ensure the correctness of this code. We can either conclude from this that code contracts are useless, or that the code is designed incorrectly.

I understand this warning is issued because I'm breaking the Liskov Principle.

So you admit it!

However, in my case, conditions are different from one concrete class to another. My BaseCommand class is actually defining some common attributes like CommandIdentifier, state, and other ultimate features I removed here to keep the question simple.

Your analysis itself suggests the proper alternative.

Instead of a BaseCommand abstract class, you should create a CommandAttributes concrete sealed class. Then include an instance of this class within all of your command objects.

By using composition rather than inheritence, each of your command classes get the functionality they need, and they can define whatever sorts of preconditions or postconditions they need. And any methods that use those classes can verify those preconditions are met and take advantage of the postconditions.

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Apparently, Code Contracts work best on Domain Objects. I am guessing your Command class is not a domain object.

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1  
my command is, in some ways, a DTO object (passing data from the UI layer to the domain).... but why do you assert CC works best with Domain objects? I think CC is a language feature, with a wide use... –  Steve B Nov 8 '11 at 8:25
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