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I'm here again. While digging in some C source code I found that fragment of code

char  **words

I know that single asterisk before variable name "points" to pointer, but what is the purpose of those two asterisks ?

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its a pointer to a pointer –  vickirk Sep 29 '11 at 10:06
    
How useful is that? Can anyone give me some simple example ? –  jingo Sep 29 '11 at 10:08
    
Very very useful, just as useful as a pointer to something that isn't a pointer, e.g. an int or a function. An extra level of indirection is always a potentially useful –  vickirk Sep 29 '11 at 10:18
    
"What are pointers to pointers good for, in practice? One use is returning pointers from functions, via pointer arguments rather than as the formal return value" c-faq.com/~scs/cclass/int/sx8.html Take your time and read the entire page ;) –  John Smith Sep 29 '11 at 10:21
    
Assuming you understand what a char* word is, adding an extra * and an s to get char** words shouldn't be too hard to visualise? –  vickirk Sep 29 '11 at 10:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you don't understand what a pointer to pointer is, you can look at this link: http://c-faq.com/~scs/cclass/int/sx8.html

Hope this helps

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It is a pointer to a pointer.

It is used primarily when you use an array of character strings.

For example: you have char sample[5][5]; - this can store 5 strings of length 4;

If you need to pass it to a function, func(sample);

And the function definition of such a function would be func(char **temp);

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simple dude! it points to the pointer thats it

**a points to the pointer *a thats it.

For more information you can google it

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// your imagination is the limit
char letter;
char *word;        // sequence of letters
char **sentence;   // sequence of words
char ***paragraph; // sequence of sentences
char ****book;     // sequence of paragraphs
char *****library; // sequence of books

The data structure is probably not the best to represent the concept: this is just an illustration.

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