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Instead of doing the following everytime

start();

// some code here

stop();

I would like to define some sort of macro which makes it possible to write like:

startstop()
{

//code here

}

Is it possible in C++?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 38 down vote accepted

You can do something very close using a small C++ helper class.

class StartStopper {
public:
    StartStopper() { start(); }
    ~StartStopper() { stop(); }
};

Then in your code:

{
    StartStopper ss;
    // code here
}

When execution enters the block and constructs the ss variable, the start() function will be called. When execution leaves the block, the StartStopper destructor will be automatically called and will then call stop().

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11  
+1. This approach is rock-solid. Even if an exception is thrown, stop() will still be called, because C++ guarantees that destructors are always called on scope exit. –  j_random_hacker Apr 17 '09 at 8:55
1  
Also it avoids sort of hard-to-debug problems that can occur with macros. –  Andy Brice Apr 17 '09 at 8:58
    
+1. The conversation in dirkgently's response is intriguing, but this is the best solution because it does not create a "secret macro language." –  John Dibling Apr 17 '09 at 12:18
1  
Btw - with MSVC++ compiler I've seen it calling a destructor before the scope was complete. It somehow detected that the variable will not be used anymore and called the destructor immediately, although there were still more things left in the scope. –  Vilx- Apr 18 '09 at 9:21
    
@Vilx: Interesting. I checked the standard and that is definitely non-conforming behaviour if the destructor has side effects (side-effect-free destruction is allowed earlier than scope exit by 3.7.2.3). –  j_random_hacker Apr 18 '09 at 16:02

The idiomatic way of doing this in C++ is called Resource Acquisition Is Initialization, or shortly RAII. In addition to providing what you want, it also has the added benefit of being exception safe: the stop function will be called even if your code throws an exception.

Define a guard struct:

struct startstop_guard
{
    startstop_guard()
    {
        start();
    }
    ~startstop_guard()
    {
        stop();
    }
};

and then rewrite your code this way:

{
    startstop_guard g;
    // your code
}

The guard's destructor (and thus the stop function) will be called automatically at the end of the enclosing block.

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+1. RAII! RAII! RAII! :) –  j_random_hacker Apr 17 '09 at 8:56
    
Hey, no need for finally :) –  Skurmedel Jun 4 '09 at 9:21

Other answers have addressed the RAII side of the question well, so I'm going to address the syntax side of it.

#define startstop for(Starter s; s.loop; s.loop = false)
struct Starter {
    bool loop;
    Starter() { start(); loop = true; }
    ~Starter() { stop(); }
};

Used like:

startstop {
    // some code
}

Should be self-explanatory enough.

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indeed, i wanted to write exactly that thing too. you could also do #define startstop() if(...) ... , which would have the benefit of not touching things like int startstop = 1; and so on. i.e a function-like macro would need parens to do substitution, which would be safer (and would also directly correspond to his wishes, and would additionally allow pushing arguments to Starter's ctor). but you still get +1 of course :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 17 '09 at 9:57
    
Yeah good point. –  Iraimbilanja Apr 17 '09 at 9:59
    
one other thing: as of c++03, the compiler is allowed to take a copy of Starter() and bind the reference to that copy. that means, you would create two objects (one explicitly, and one created by the compiler for binding the reference to it). you would, similar to alexandrescu's scope_guard's implementation, need to introduce a mutable boolean variable which you set to false (rhs.bool_var) by a cctor and true in the default ctor, and this->bool_var by the cctor. only if it is true call end()) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 17 '09 at 10:04
    
so something like (inverted the _guard meaning, because i think it makes more sense :)) struct Starter { mutable bool trash; Starter() : trash() { start(); } Starter(Starter const& rhs):trash(rhs.trash) { rhs.trash = true; } ~Starter() { if(!trash) end(); } operator bool() const { return false; } }. now, end is called only once, for the one that was not copied (the one that was bound to the reference). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 17 '09 at 10:11
    
whoa does C++ allows a copy here? weird, why would it :) Thanks for the improvement. Now the code is sufficiently complicated that I'm compelled to write an "explanation" section :) –  Iraimbilanja Apr 17 '09 at 10:23
#define startstop(x, y, ...) for( /* use macro args */ )
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+1, even if not that many people will understand the dependency injection there... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 17 '09 at 9:26
1  
-1 for incomplete and unclear implementation. –  Iraimbilanja Apr 17 '09 at 9:40
    
@Iraimbilanja: What is unclear and what is incomplete? The question does not specify anything about start() or stop(). –  dirkgently Apr 17 '09 at 9:42
1  
The question specifies the signatures of start() and stop(), and requests a macro that makes the "startstop { ... }" syntax call start() at the opening brace and stop() at the closing brace. Your answer does not provide a working implementation of that. It is unclear what the /*use macro args*/ comment should be replaced with, and it's unclear how the macro arguments x and y are related to the question. FWIW it is possible to make a working implementation with 'for' but you haven't done it. –  Iraimbilanja Apr 17 '09 at 9:51
    
you should mention that "..." syntax is c99 and not yet part of C++ (will be with c++1x) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 17 '09 at 9:59

Generic solution with RAII and boost::function ( std::function ).

class starter
{
    typedef boost::function< void () > action;
    action end_;
public:
    starter(action start, action end):
        end_(end)
    { 
        log("starter start");
        start(); 
    }
    ~starter()
    { 
        log("starter end");
        end_() ; 
    }
};
int main()
{
    {
        starter s(start, stop);
        middle();
    }

    return 0;
}

or to test and check the idea

    void print(const std::string& message)
    {
        std::cout << message << std::endl;
    }
    int main()
    {
        starter s(boost::bind(print, "globalstart"),
                  boost::bind(print, "globalend")); 

        {
            starter s(boost::bind(print, "start"),
                      boost::bind(print, "end")); 
            std::cout << "middle" << std::endl;
        }
        return 0;
    }
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+1 Nice implementation of scoped guards using boost::function, can be combined with dependency injection into a macro for a more natural usage. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 17 '09 at 9:32

What are you trying to do? I'd recommend checking out RAII as a much more C++ oriented way of doing things than macro hacking, with all its unforeseen consequences.

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Don't use macros. You can use inline functions instead as it provides type checking and other features. You can take a look here: inline functions

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-1 inline functions are completely irrelevant. –  Iraimbilanja Apr 17 '09 at 9:38

In c#, you could use the IDisposable pattern, and implement your Stop() functionality in the Dispose() method, but that would would work if you were using a .net variant of c++.

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eh, aside from being off-topic, C++/CLI doesn't even have the using() construct of C#. –  Iraimbilanja Apr 18 '09 at 17:00

credit to dirkgently for the idea.. I thought I'd fill the rest in

#define startstop() for(start();isStarted();stop())

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