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How do you link a single file from another git repository to your own repository? I don't want the full repository, just a single file. Using git submodule seems like the right route to go, but it wants to grab the whole thing.

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Although it's not linking, git archive can be helpful for getting one or more files from another git repo, e.g. git archive --format=tar --remote=your_chef_git_repo_uri HEAD: some_file another_file | tar -x –  Gary S. Weaver Apr 26 at 0:52

2 Answers 2

up vote -2 down vote accepted

If you don't need to track changes to that file, create a symlink to it:

  • Unix-like: ln -s <original_file> <link_file>
  • Windows >= Vista/2008: mklink <link_file> <original_file>

If your scenario is really a single file, you could just copy the file in place, but keep in mind the file might change and you don't want to copy it over and over again - until you forget.

You could also use a git-submodule or a git-subtree.

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I guess I'm just going to try a mklink. Problem is that git doesn't support them in Windows. –  Brendan Byrd Oct 1 '11 at 2:43
    
Try junction.exe –  Vince Panuccio Aug 8 at 10:38

Considering that the unit of work for git is a repository (or more precisely a repository content), I don't think you can easily integrate one file.

If you don't need its history, you could consider simply copy it in your repo.
But if you do need the history, then some git filter-branch (as in "git: How to split off library from project? filter-branch, subtree?") are in order. That seems a lot of effort for just one file though.

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