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I have to XML (de)serialize the following class:

enter image description here

this gives the following output:

<ArrayOfPropertyFilter xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
                       xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <PropertyFilter>
    <AndOr>And</AndOr>
    <LeftBracket>None</LeftBracket>
    <Property>17</Property>
    <Operator>Equal</Operator>
    <Value xsi:type="xsd:string">lll</Value>
    <RightBracket>None</RightBracket>
  </PropertyFilter>
</ArrayOfPropertyFilter>

and, after deserialization it gives enter image description here

How can I "tell" to Serializer to keep the Value "as is", without any XML node....(in the concrete case the Value should be "lll" and not XMLNode containing Text "lll") ?

EDIT

Bellow is a full working sample in C#. The output is

Value is = 'System.Xml.XmlNode[]'

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

namespace WindowsFormsApplication13
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            PropertyFilter filter = new PropertyFilter();
            filter.AndOr = "Jora";
            filter.Value = "haha";
            filter.Property = 15;

            var xml = filter.SerializeToString();
            XmlDocument xmlDoc = new XmlDocument();
            xmlDoc.LoadXml(xml);

            PropertyFilter cloneFilter = xmlDoc.Deserialize<PropertyFilter>();

            Console.WriteLine("Value is = '{0}'", cloneFilter.Value);
        }
    }

    public class PropertyFilter
    {
        public string AndOr { get; set; }
        public string LeftBracket { get; set; }
        public int Property { get; set; }
        public string Operator { get; set; }
        public object Value { get; set; }
        public string RightBracket { get; set; }
    }

    public static class Utils
    {
        public static string SerializeToString(this object instance)
        {
            if (instance == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("instance");
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            StringWriter sw = new StringWriter(sb);
            XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(
                instance.GetType(), null, new Type[0], null, null);
            serializer.Serialize(sw, instance);
            return sb.ToString();
        }

        public static T Deserialize<T>(this XmlDocument xmlDoc)
        {
            XmlNodeReader reader = new XmlNodeReader(xmlDoc.DocumentElement);
            XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
            object obj = serializer.Deserialize(reader);
            T myT = (T)obj;
            return myT;
        }

    }
}

EDIT 2

To stress the Anton answer, the second example (updated with the Groo's remarks):

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

namespace WindowsFormsApplication13
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            PropertyFilter filter = new PropertyFilter();
            filter.AndOr = "Jora";
            var obj = new Hehe();
            obj.Behehe = 4526;
            filter.Value = obj;
            filter.Property = 15;

            var xml = filter.SerializeToString();
            PropertyFilter cloneFilter = xml.Deserialize<PropertyFilter>();

            Console.WriteLine("Value is = '{0}'", cloneFilter.Value);
        }
    }

    public class Hehe
    {
        public int Behehe { get; set; }
        public override string ToString()
        {
            return string.Format("behehe is '{0}'", Behehe);
        }
    }

    public class PropertyFilter
    {
        public string AndOr { get; set; }
        public string LeftBracket { get; set; }
        public int Property { get; set; }
        public string Operator { get; set; }
        //[XmlElement(typeof(Hehe))]
        public object Value { get; set; }
        public string RightBracket { get; set; }
    }

    public static class Utils
    {
        public static string SerializeToString(this object instance)
        {
            if (instance == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("instance");
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

            XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(instance.GetType(), null, new Type[0], null, null);
            using (StringWriter sw = new StringWriter(sb))
            {
                serializer.Serialize(sw, instance);
            }
            return sb.ToString();
        }

        public static T Deserialize<T>(this string xmlString)
        {
            XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
            using (StringReader sr = new StringReader(xmlString))
            {
                return (T)serializer.Deserialize(sr);
            }
        }

    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What is the XML you are expecting ? – Seb Sep 29 '11 at 13:46
    
@Seb As I mentioned, I want my deserialized Value be object(string) not an XmlNode. I demonstrated the Xml format just for curiosity, I don't care about Xml, but about the deserialized value... – serhio Sep 29 '11 at 14:40
1  
If this property is going to contain only strings, then why don't you simply change its type to string? But if it can contain any object, then you obviously need to store the type information somewhere. – Groo Sep 29 '11 at 15:18
1  
@serhio: any code which wants to deserialize your xml into a real CLR object needs to know the exact type of the object in order to create it. This is why XmlSerializer creates an XmlNode, which contains this information (in your case, it has a xsi:type attribute with the value "xsd:string" - this is your object's type). So, in any case, you need to save this type information somewhere in order to be able to retrieve later. As @Seb and myself pointed out, if you want to store this type information in some specific way, please describe it in your question. – Groo Sep 29 '11 at 18:31
1  
@serhio: I feel like we are not understanding each other. Can you answer this question: imagine that I have just sent you an XML file containing the following text: <Value>10d</Value>. You start your application and it deserializes the file into an object. What will be the type of your Value property after deserialization, and why? – Groo Sep 30 '11 at 14:12
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Gree's solution will work as long as Value takes values of primitive, XSD-defined types like string and int, or user-defined types mentioned somewhere in T's definition (T itself, the types of its properties etc.) As soon as you need to deserialize a value of a type different from these, you must declare all possible types of Value with XmlElementAttribute, e.g.

[XmlElement (typeof (string))]
[XmlElement (typeof (int))]
[XmlElement (typeof (MyType), Namespace = "http://example.com/schemas/my")]
public object Value { get ; set ; }
share|improve this answer
    
so, you are trying to explain, that the "object" type is not deserializable in a "object" type, but in a "sample" type listed somewhere.... – serhio Sep 30 '11 at 14:24
1  
Yes. The XML serializer must know about all your types in advance to deserialize them. In your case, when it encounters the <LeftBracket> node, XML deserializer can convert the string 'None' to a value of your enum type because it knows that the property LeftBracket has this enum type. For a property of type object, either you must tell the XML deserializer what types to expect or deserialize it manually. – Anton Tykhyy Sep 30 '11 at 14:32
    
@serhio, Anton: there is no need for all of this if you use a TextReader instead of a XmlReader. – Groo Sep 30 '11 at 14:40
    
Actually you do need this sometimes, see post. – Anton Tykhyy Sep 30 '11 at 14:51
    
@Anton: That's correct, I disregarded that fact. It's just that I dislike having to remember to update this attribute whenever I decide to add a new type. Well, serializing an object without type information is a bit strange in any case (actually, I rarely use plain object properties for anything). Also, this way the "Value" property gets "lost" in the resulting XML (ints are serialized as <int> elements, strings as <string>, etc.) - not that it matters to OP anyway. – Groo Sep 30 '11 at 15:04

Ok, that makes sense, you were using a XmlDocument for deserialization. Simply use a String (or any stream reader, like @Seb already pointed out), and it will work:

public static class Utils
{
    public static string SerializeToString(this object instance)
    {
        if (instance == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("instance");

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(instance.GetType());

        using (StringWriter sw = new StringWriter(sb))
        {
            serializer.Serialize(sw, instance);
        }

        return sb.ToString();
    }

    public static T Deserialize<T>(this string xmlString)
    {
        XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
        using (StringReader sr = new StringReader(xmlString))
        {
            return (T)serializer.Deserialize(sr);
        }
    }
}

Usage:

// serialize
var xml = filter.SerializeToString();

// deserialize
var cloneFilter = xml.Deserialize<PropertyFilter>();

[Edit]

Also, as a side note: never forget to dispose objects implementing IDisposable. That's why the using constructs are added for any instantiated Stream.

[Edit2]

As Anton said, in this case you need to specify extra types explicitly, because XmlSerializer doesn't search for all possible types to find a matching class.

A slightly better solution might be to use a XmlSerializer overload which accepts these types (so that you don't need to manually add attributes):

public static T Deserialize<T>(this string xmlString)
{
    Type[] typesToInclude = GetAllPossibleTypes();

    XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T), typesToInclude);
    using (StringReader sr = new StringReader(xmlString))
    {
        return (T)serializer.Deserialize(sr);
    }
}

This can be done once, at application startup, but you do need to provide the appropriate assembly (or several assemblies) to make sure that all possible types are covered:

public static class Utils
{
    private static readonly Type[] _typesToInclude = GetPossibleUserTypes();

    private static Type[] GetPossibleUserTypes()
    {
        // this part should be changed to load types from the assembly
        // that contains your potential Value candidates
        Assembly assembly = Assembly.GetAssembly(typeof(PropertyFilter));

        // get public classes only
        return assembly.GetTypes().Where(t => t.IsPublic && !t.IsAbstract).ToArray();
    }

    public static string SerializeToString(this object instance)
    {
        if (instance == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("instance");

        var sb = new StringBuilder();
        var serializer = new XmlSerializer(instance.GetType(), _typesToInclude);

        using (StringWriter sw = new StringWriter(sb))
        {
            serializer.Serialize(sw, instance);
        }

        return sb.ToString();
    }

    public static T Deserialize<T>(this string xmlString)
    {
        var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T), _typesToInclude);
        using (StringReader sr = new StringReader(xmlString))
        {
            return (T)serializer.Deserialize(sr);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
To be fair, this is what @Seb actually wrote in the first place, so I believe the credit goes to him/her. – Groo Sep 30 '11 at 14:45
    
Thank for the remarks. But Anton Tykhyy has reason too. See my second sample. Without the attribute the serialization fails. – serhio Sep 30 '11 at 15:23

Ok, try this but I'm not sure of what you're trying to achieve.

public class PropertyFilter
{
    public string AndOr {get; set;}
    public string LeftBracket {get; set;}
    public int Property {get; set;}
    public string Operator {get; set;}
    public object Value {get; set;}
    public string RightBracket {get; set;}
}
    public void MyMethod()
    {
        using (System.IO.StreamReader reader = new System.IO.StreamReader(@"Input.xml"))
        {
            System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(PropertyFilter[]));
            PropertyFilter[] deserialized = (PropertyFilter[])serializer.Deserialize(reader);
        }
    }

I just put your sample XML in Input.xml file. I hope this will help.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry, didn't pay attention to the properties... The Value field is not string, but Object. The question is about deserializing Objects, not strings... With strings as all OK. I gave an example with string, but there could be any object. – serhio Sep 29 '11 at 16:01
    
@serhio : I changed the type of the propert but the mechanism is the same. – Seb Sep 29 '11 at 16:09
    
I understand the mecanism, but I don't like the result. Instead of Object in the deserialied object I have an XmlNode as you can see in the image. I serialize as Value an Object, but deserialize... an XmlNode! Is not good. – serhio Sep 29 '11 at 16:23
    
just to be clear, I used the "mechanism" you describe BEFORE posting that question, in order to obtain the deserialized value. So does not worth posting that as answer, because the question was how to obtain proper value, and not how to (de)serialize. Merci en tout cas d'avoir essayé de m'aider. – serhio Sep 30 '11 at 9:09

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