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Can someone explain Activator.CreateInstance() purpose in detail?

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13  
What part of the published documentation was so unclear that it motivated you to ask strangers for help? I would like to improve the documentation. – Eric Lippert Sep 29 '11 at 14:08
4  
Probably that the greater documentation and example isn't available in the generic overloads. I would encourage that the documentation from CreateInstance(Type type) is matched with the CreateInstance<T>() overload. – Claus Jørgensen Sep 29 '11 at 21:35
up vote 68 down vote accepted

Say you have a class called MyFancyObject like this one below:

class MyFancyObject
{
 public int A { get;set;}
}

It lets you turn:

String ClassName = "MyFancyObject";

Into

MyFancyObject obj;

Using

obj = (MyFancyObject)Activator.CreateInstance("MyAssembly", ClassName))

and can then do stuff like:

obj.A = 100;

That's its purpose. It also has many other overloads such as providing a Type instead of the class name in a string. Why you would have a problem like that is a different story. Here's some people who needed it:

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2  
This proved useful to me. In my case, the class was in a different namespace, so I had to make sure that I included the namespace in my ClassName string (i.e. String ClassName = "My.Namespace.MyFancyObject";). – Scott Jun 17 '13 at 20:14
1  
You forgot to add the Unwrap(). You can also put null, instead of "MyAssembly", and system will search current Assembly. – Tony Sep 18 '13 at 1:34
    
Can I do something like this obj = (MyFancyObject)Activator.CreateInstance("MyAssembly", ClassName)) but instead of casting with the type. Cast with type made from the ClassName? Like this Type type = Type.GetType(ClassName);obj = (type )Activator.CreateInstance("MyAssembly", ClassName)) ? – rluks Mar 26 '15 at 16:09
    
@Pan.student YES for more info, here is a perfect tutorial video showcasing that exact line of code, using generics and delegates. JeremyBytes - C# Generics - Part 3: Methods & Delegates - You Tube – Chef_Code Nov 9 '15 at 8:21

Well i can give you an example why to use something like that. Think of a game where you want to store your level and enemies in an XML file. When you parse this file, you might have an element like this.

<Enemy X="10" Y="100" Type="MyGame.OrcGuard"/>

what you can do now is, create dynamically the objects found in your level file.

foreach(XmlNode node in doc)
   var enemy = Activator.CreateInstance(null, node.Attributes["Type"]);

This is very useful, for building dynamic enviroments. Of course its also possible to use this for Plugin or addin scenarios and alot more.

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I understood that it was to create a new instance of a type, but this is a nice simple example of why one would want to do so. – jamiebarrow Feb 8 '12 at 13:51

My good friend MSDN can explain it to you, with a example

Here is the code in case the link or content changes in the future:

using System;

class DynamicInstanceList
{
    private static string instanceSpec = "System.EventArgs;System.Random;" +
        "System.Exception;System.Object;System.Version";

    public static void Main()
    {
        string[] instances = instanceSpec.Split(';');
        Array instlist = Array.CreateInstance(typeof(object), instances.Length);
        object item;
        for (int i = 0; i < instances.Length; i++)
        {
            // create the object from the specification string
            Console.WriteLine("Creating instance of: {0}", instances[i]);
            item = Activator.CreateInstance(Type.GetType(instances[i]));
            instlist.SetValue(item, i);
        }
        Console.WriteLine("\nObjects and their default values:\n");
        foreach (object o in instlist)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Type:     {0}\nValue:    {1}\nHashCode: {2}\n",
                o.GetType().FullName, o.ToString(), o.GetHashCode());
        }
    }
}

// This program will display output similar to the following: 
// 
// Creating instance of: System.EventArgs 
// Creating instance of: System.Random 
// Creating instance of: System.Exception 
// Creating instance of: System.Object 
// Creating instance of: System.Version 
// 
// Objects and their default values: 
// 
// Type:     System.EventArgs 
// Value:    System.EventArgs 
// HashCode: 46104728 
// 
// Type:     System.Random 
// Value:    System.Random 
// HashCode: 12289376 
// 
// Type:     System.Exception 
// Value:    System.Exception: Exception of type 'System.Exception' was thrown. 
// HashCode: 55530882 
// 
// Type:     System.Object 
// Value:    System.Object 
// HashCode: 30015890 
// 
// Type:     System.Version 
// Value:    0.0 
// HashCode: 1048575
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1  
Unlikely to happen for MSDN, and copying the content here is almost a violation of copyright ;) – Claus Jørgensen Jun 22 '13 at 18:07
5  
You're right. Personally I feel the principle also works to give better answers. I often come to SO with a lot on my mind from my current project. I usually just want a simple and to-the-point answer, so I can continue where I left off. I hate having to open up articles, which sometimes even link to other articles. Many answerers don't realize that many people don't come here with time on their hands to read through several articles, with a ton of unnecessary introductions and talks. Briefly summing up the important parts of a good article is key to some of the greatest answers I've seen. – Aske B. Jun 26 '13 at 20:42

You can also do this -

var handle = Activator.CreateInstance("AssemblyName", 
                "Full name of the class including the namespace and class name");
var obj = handle.Unwrap();
share|improve this answer
    
The Unwrap() was the missing piece. :) – Tony Sep 18 '13 at 1:38
    
I can't find the 'Unwrap()' method above to use (as above). Has something changed in the new .NET APIs? – Sam May 6 '15 at 14:36
    
It's still there in System namespace. – William May 8 '15 at 16:24
    
Could you provide some additional explanation on what .Unwrap() does precisely and how this relates to other solutions? – Jeroen Vannevel May 10 '15 at 23:36

A good example could be next: for instance you have a set of Loggers and you allows user to specify type to be used in runtime via configuration file.

Then:

string rawLoggerType = configurationService.GetLoggerType();
Type loggerType = Type.GetType(rawLoggerType);
ILogger logger = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(loggerType)) as ILogger;

OR another case is when you have a common entities factory, which creates entity, and is also responsible on initialization of an entity by data received from DB:

(pseudocode)

public TEntity CreateEntityFromDataRow<TEntity>(DataRow row)
 where TEntity : IDbEntity, class
{
   MethodInfo methodInfo = typeof(T).GetMethod("BuildFromDataRow");
   TEntity instance = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(TEntity)) as TEntity;
   return methodInfo.Invoke(instance, new object[] { row } ) as TEntity;
}
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The Activator.CreateInstance method creates an instance of a specified type using the constructor that best matches the specified parameters.

For example, let's say that you have the type name as a string, and you want to use the string to create an instance of that type. You could use Activator.CreateInstance for this:

string objTypeName = "Foo";
Foo foo = (Foo)Activator.CreateInstance(Type.GetType(objTypeName));

Here's an MSDN article that explains it's application in more detail:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/wccyzw83.aspx

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5  
Or you could just use new Foo(). I think the OP wanted a more realistic example. – Konrad Rudolph Sep 29 '11 at 13:38
    
I agree with @Konrad. The reason for using CreateInstance is if you don't know the type of object you are going to instantiate at design time. In this example, you clearly know it's of type Foo since you are casting it as type Foo. You would never do this because you can just do Foo foo = new Foo(). – theyetiman Dec 23 '13 at 16:15

Building off of deepee1 and this, here's how to accept a class name in a string, and then use it to read and write to a database with LINQ. I use "dynamic" instead of deepee1's casting because it allows me to assign properties, which allows us to dynamically select and operate on any table we want.

Type tableType = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetType("NameSpace.TableName");
ITable itable = dbcontext.GetTable(tableType);

//prints contents of the table
foreach (object y in itable) {
    string value = (string)y.GetType().GetProperty("ColumnName").GetValue(y, null);
    Console.WriteLine(value);
}

//inserting into a table
dynamic tableClass = Activator.CreateInstance(tableType);
//Alternative to using tableType, using Tony's tips
dynamic tableClass = Activator.CreateInstance(null, "NameSpace.TableName").Unwrap();
tableClass.Word = userParameter;
itable.InsertOnSubmit(tableClass);
dbcontext.SubmitChanges();

//sql equivalent
dbcontext.ExecuteCommand("INSERT INTO [TableNme]([ColumnName]) VALUES ({0})", userParameter);
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