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Is there any way (hack) to push Python function (def) to return results by reference even for immutable types?

A proposal application (swap as subroutine):
def swap(a, b):
.....a,b = b,a

Note:
def swap(a, b):
.....return b,a

works as function which is not the answer of the question!


For example there is a function random.shuffle(a) that works in-place. My idea is to call a function written in Fortran/C++ and call them via Python. It does work but has disadvantages too.
note:
Both "lambda" and "def" (as function) have the following problem: a, b = swap(a, b) which requires care about order of variables. In my proposal (if it was possible) the subroutine is used as: swap(a, b) so there is no requirement to care about order of variable.

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I don't know if I got it right, but you seem to be looking for lambda function. Can you give more detailed explanation and example? –  heltonbiker Sep 29 '11 at 13:57
1  
No and you don't want that for sure. –  JBernardo Sep 29 '11 at 14:06
1  
Both "lambda" and "def" (as function) have the following problem: a, b = swap(a, b) which requires care about order of variables. In my proposal (if it was possible) the subroutine is used as: swap(a, b) so there is no requirement to care about order of variable. –  Developer Sep 29 '11 at 14:06
    
shuffle works inplace because it modifies the object it gets. The latter keeps its identity. It would not be possible to replace the given list with another one. –  glglgl Sep 29 '11 at 14:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

All names in Python are references. And no, there are no "out" references (e.g. in a C++ sense) available. You need to pass a mutable object and then you can mutate it in the function. But then again, returning new value(s) should be the preferred way.

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1  
Please see my comment bellow the question which demonstrates the advantages of my proposal. –  Developer Sep 29 '11 at 14:10
1  
@Developer: No, there are no advantages, and not only because it's impossible. It's not an idiomatic code. Idiomatic swap is a, b = b, a. –  Cat Plus Plus Sep 29 '11 at 14:26
    
Please note that swap is only an example to explain the idea. –  Developer Sep 29 '11 at 14:28
    
@Developer: Being able to trample immutability is an advantage? –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 29 '11 at 14:31

No, such things don't exist, because you get the given object as a reference, but if you re-assign it, it won't be changed back.

You either have to work with a mutable container (list, dict, object with attributes) in this case.

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In python there is no way to pass a "write pointer". You can pass an object and a name (so the callee can use for example setattr) or you can pass a list and an index. There is no such a thing as a context free "address of a modifiable cell"... there are only names or indexes that however also need a context (which namespace, which array).

In the general case if you really need to pass a write pointer a solution in Python is to pass a "setter" function that can be used by the callee to set the value.

For example:

def foo(setter):
    setter(42)

def bar():
    x = [1,2,3,4]

    def setFirst(value):
        x[0] = value

    foo(setFirst)

    print x[0] # --> 42
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