Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

In the following functions, it it entirely possible for the IObserver's Process() function to try to remove itself from the notify list, using the this pointer's DeleteObserver().

This causes hell with the iterators (not surprisingly!), is there a way round this? Or should I be taking a closer look at my design?

void cButtonManager::DeleteObserver(IObserver *observer)
{
    list<IObserver*>::iterator iter;
    for (iter = m_ObserverList.begin(); iter != m_ObserverList.end(); ++iter)
    {
        if (*iter == observer)
        {
            // Found the specified observer in the list, delete it
            m_ObserverList.erase(iter);
            return;
        }
    }
}

void cButtonManager::NotifyObservers(void)
{
    list<IObserver*>::iterator iter;
    for (iter = m_ObserverList.begin(); iter != m_ObserverList.end(); ++iter)
    {
        (*iter)->Process(this);
    }
}

For example, imagine that the list is a collection of people that subscribe to a magazine and the Process() function is the delivery of a new magazine issue; if the magazines latest issue is awful the subscriber may wish to un-subscribe as a direct result of that issue.

share|improve this question
2  
Define "causes hell". –  GWW Sep 29 '11 at 15:03
    
This code is legal as far as I see. The only problem you may have is if you have several threads accessing the list, or if you receive a DeleteObserver call while you're in the middle of another loop through the list. –  Diego Sevilla Sep 29 '11 at 15:05
    
@GWW: The (iter*)->Process() function returns and the program crashes, because iter now points to nothing at all, so the ++iter operation fails. @Diego: Yup, you got it, the deletion is occurring within the process-loop. –  Siyfion Sep 29 '11 at 15:05
    
@Siyfion, but this means that Process is indirectly calling DeleteObserer. If that happens, yes, this code is problematic. –  Diego Sevilla Sep 29 '11 at 15:08
1  
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/596162/… ? –  ltjax Sep 29 '11 at 15:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Edit:

Some people in comments corrected me, so I will change this answer. But don't upvote, as it's the commenters' solution, not mine.

(*iter++)->Process();
share|improve this answer
    
You could use the iterator returned by erase and return that from Process, assigning it to iter. –  rubenvb Sep 29 '11 at 15:40
5  
You can also write (*iter++)->Process();. It's a bit tricksy, but the sequence point at the start of the function call to Process guarantees that the side effect of incrementing iter occurs before the old value of iter can be invalidated by whatever Process does. –  Steve Jessop Sep 29 '11 at 15:45
1  
@Griwes: it's guaranteed by the standard, although it takes some close reading to convince yourself of it. Basically the operand of operator-> is evaluated before the operator is, and hence before the call to Process. The sequence point on the function call forces the side-effects to be completed too. –  Steve Jessop Sep 29 '11 at 15:52
2  
@Griwe, the upvotes are not there for you, they're for the readers. :) –  avakar Sep 29 '11 at 16:09
2  
Even better, I've realised it's less tricksy than I thought. In the case of std::list, the iterator must be a user-defined type (well library-defined, but the effect is the same). It can't just be a pointer like vector can, or like a generic iterator could be. So, it has an operator++ function, and hence the side-effects of iter++ are guaranteed to have completed when operator++ returns, which is even earlier than I said above. –  Steve Jessop Sep 30 '11 at 8:40

I don't see why you are not using list::remove here. That seems like a perfect match to me.

For the problem in NotifyObserver I would not let Process do the removing itself but rather let it signal that it wants itself to be removed from the list of observer. Plainly: return a bool from Process to signal and then call list::erase on it. Assign the return value of erase to the current iter.

share|improve this answer
1  
FWIW, list::remove removes all elements matching a value, whereas the code shown in DeleteObserver only removes one. I strongly suspect that there can only be one match, so the difference is only one of performance, not effect. I don't think it helps with actual question, though, which is about the code in NotifyObservers, not the code in DeleteObserver (which Process is permitted to call, but presumably Process can do other worthwhile things too). –  Steve Jessop Sep 29 '11 at 15:57
    
@SteveJessop The current behaviour rather looks like a bug to me than intentional, but that is up to the OP. I tried to provide a simple solution for the second function. –  pmr Sep 29 '11 at 16:15
    
@pmr Indeed there can only be one match in the list to an Observer, the AddObserver() function (not shown) checks for uniqueness. The reason why I am using erase is because I was wondering if I would need the returned iterator (which remove() doesn't provide). Also, the other problem is that Process could remove itself from the list, but it's also entirely possible that DeleteObserver() is called elsewhere too (in the same thread however). –  Siyfion Sep 30 '11 at 7:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.