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Given the backbone view function below, what is the correct way of passing this (i.e. the current view) to the anonymous function defined in the callbacks?

addSomething: function(e) {
    var newSomething= this.model.somethings.create({
        someProperty: xxx
    }, {
        success: function(m, response) {
            this.doSomething(); //***HERE****
        },
        error: function(m, response) {
            //Error
        }
    });
},

Without and changes, the this in the anon function is set to the window.

I can a set a reference like this:

var thisView = this;

and then just refer to thisView instead of this in the anon function, but this doesn't seem very elegant. Is there a better way?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

In order to better organize my code and work around this problem, I never put success and error callbacks directly in-line with my calls. I always split them out to their own functions. This let's me keep the code clean and also use the _.bindAll method to ensure I have the correct context for this.

SomeView = Backbone.View.extend({
  initialize: function(){
    _.bindAll(this, "createSuccess", "createError");
  },

  addSomething: function(e) {
    var newSomething= this.model.somethings.create({someProperty: xxx}, {
      success: this.createSuccess,
      error: this.createError
    });
  },

  createSuccess: function(m, response) {
    this.doSomething();
  },

  createError: function(m, response) {
    //Error
  }
});
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This seems like a nice tidy approach. I'm a little concerned about how many functions I'm going to get in my views, but I think it's a good compromise. –  UpTheCreek Sep 29 '11 at 15:07
1  
yeah, it's all trade-offs, really. jumbled code with lots of nested functions vs lots of functions. i prefer lots of separate functions as it's just easier to read. :) –  Derick Bailey Sep 29 '11 at 15:10
1  
I agree with @DerickBailey. I wouldn't call it a trade-off. It is about writing readable and maintainable code. If you have too many functions in your view that it is a problem, then you are probably doing too much in your view and you should break it up more. –  Brian Genisio Sep 29 '11 at 15:18
    
@BrianGenisio Well I think readability is a rather subjective topic. How do you propose I break up the view object? –  UpTheCreek Sep 30 '11 at 9:14
    
@UpTheCreek: Although readability might be subjective at the individual level, we know that there are things you can do to make things more objectively readable... in other words, studies have found... etc etc. Anyways, When I suggest that you break things up, I am coming from a "Separations of Concerns" perspective. Lots of methods on a class are a "code smell" and often indicate that a class is doing too much. When that happens, you need to ask "what are the things that this class does". If it is more than one thing, break it up along those lines. –  Brian Genisio Sep 30 '11 at 11:08

You could also use the that convention:

addSomething: function(e) {

var that = this;

var newSomething= this.model.somethings.create({
        someProperty: xxx
    }, {
        success: function(m, response) {
            that.doSomething(); //***THAT HERE****
        },
        error: function(m, response) {
            //Error
        }
    });
}

This is quite a common pattern in javascript especially when context is lost with nested functions. Nested functions do have access to the variables in the outer function and hence it works.

Derick's approach makes the code cleaner, irrespective of the fact of having extra functions but if you don't want them use 'that' ;)

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This has been my approach so far. –  UpTheCreek Sep 30 '11 at 9:12
    
I actually believe this approach is better than the adopted answer, as the programmers do not need to hard code all the methods they want to bind. –  Truman's world Oct 22 at 16:21

You can use call:

this.doSomething.call(this);

Or send whatever you want this to be in doSomething

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Interesting - have not used call before. –  UpTheCreek Sep 29 '11 at 15:05

After getting sick of seeing one too many 'var that = this;' I've started passing a 'view' attribute to the options of the call.

this.model.destroy({success:
    function (model, resp, options) {
        model.releaseLock(false);
        window.location.href = options.view.getURLForModelID(model.get('id'));
    },
    error: function (model, resp, options) {
        options.view.displayError(resp.message);
    },
    view: this
});
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You can pass context seemingly without using call, bind or apply (or Lo-Dash) by creating an anonymous function, passing this, and then immediately calling the handler methods on the object's prototype as shown in the following CoffeeScript example:

View = require('views/base/view')

module.exports = class LoginPageView extends View
  template: require('./templates/login-page')
  events:
    'submit form': '_doLogin'

  # Called when the template is bound using Chaplin
  attach: ->
    super
    @$loginButton = @$('[name="login"]')

  _doLogin: (evt) ->
    evt.preventDefault()
    @$loginButton.attr 'disabled', true
    email = @$('[name="email"]').val()
    password = @$('[name="password"]').val()
    @model.save {email, password},
      success: (model, response, options) =>
        @_loginSuccess model, response, options
      error: (model, response, options) =>
        @_loginError model, response, options

  _loginSuccess: (model, response, options) ->
    # TODO: Implement method body

  _loginError: (model, response, options) ->
    # TODO: Implement method body

Perhaps it's a little verbose with the argument names, and the extra closure created by the anonymous function isn't the best implementation performance-wise, but it's certainly a bit easier to grasp and manage when working with individuals of varied skill levels.

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