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i'm trying to figure out if i'm doing something wrong with this application i'm coding.
The goal of the app is to detect if an embedded devices connected on the same LAN disconnect. A common issue on which i read a lot here on stackoverflow.
Since this embedded devices has a webserver running on the default port, the idea was to create an infinite loop and continuosly send a message on that port. If i detect an error i assume that the host is disconnected.
However after a lot of research, packet sniffing on the lan and so on, i've found that putting a send() in an infinite loop wasn't the same as if you call it for the 1st time.
The reason is that when you create a socket and call a send for the first time, it does the TCP HANDSHAKE and then send the message. But, in the same loop, when send is called again, there's no HANDSHAKE and the message is simple sent. So if i disconnect the embedded devices in this moment, the sent will return again a success and only after several attempts it fails. A similiar situation happens with the recv().
So my actual solution was to put in an infinite loop THE ENTIRE process of socket (creation,connection,send,destruction). Here's what i made in the end:

while(true){
SOCKET ConnectSocket = INVALID_SOCKET;
ConnectSocket = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, IPPROTO_TCP);
   if (ConnectSocket == INVALID_SOCKET) {
       cout <<"socket failed with error: "<< WSAGetLastError();
       WSACleanup();
       return 0;
        } 

    iResult= ioctlsocket(ConnectSocket,FIONBIO,&ulMode);
    if (iResult != NO_ERROR)
        cout<<"ioctlsocket failed with error: "<<iResult<<endl;
        iResult= setsockopt(ConnectSocket,SOL_SOCKET,SO_REUSEADDR,(char *) &bOptVal,bOptLen);
            if (iResult == SOCKET_ERROR) {
                   wprintf(L"setsockopt for SO_REUSEADDR failed with error: %u\n", WSAGetLastError());
                    closesocket(ConnectSocket);
                                        WSACleanup();
               } else
                    wprintf(L"Set SO_REUSEADDR: ON\n");

            iResult= setsockopt(ConnectSocket,SOL_SOCKET, SO_LINGER, (char FAR*)&linger, sizeof(linger));
                        if (iResult == SOCKET_ERROR) {
                                wprintf(L"setsockopt for SO_LINGER failed with error: %u\n", WSAGetLastError());
                             closesocket(ConnectSocket);
                                                WSACleanup();
                            } else
                                wprintf(L"Set SO_LINGER: ON\n");


           if(connect( ConnectSocket,(SOCKADDR*) &saServer, sizeof(saServer))==SOCKET_ERROR){
                cout <<WSAGetLastError()<<endl;
                if(WSAGetLastError() == WSAEWOULDBLOCK)
                {

                    fd_set fsConnect;
                    FD_ZERO(&fsConnect);
                    FD_SET(ConnectSocket, &fsConnect);
                    timeval sTimeoutVal;
                    sTimeoutVal.tv_sec = (long)2;
                    sTimeoutVal.tv_usec = (long)0;
                    int retval = select(FD_SETSIZE, (fd_set *) NULL, &fsConnect, (fd_set *)
                    NULL, &sTimeoutVal);
                    if(retval != 1)
                    {

                        closesocket(ConnectSocket);
                        WSACleanup();
                        return 1;
                        }
                    } else{
                        closesocket(ConnectSocket);
                        WSACleanup();
                        return 1;
                        }
                        }


           int iBytes = send(ConnectSocket, sendbuf, (int)strlen(sendbuf), 0);
            shutdown(ConnectSocket,SD_SEND);
            closesocket(ConnectSocket);
            if(iBytes == -1 || iBytes != (int)strlen(sendbuf))
            {
            //send failed machine went down

            WSACleanup();
            return 1;
            }
                   Sleep(1000);}

Basically the program works fine. Since it iterates every second, i don't know if it's actually correct from a O.S. perspective cause i don't know if this way i'm doing something wrong.
Moreover, i noticed that a lot of open ports remained in a TIME_WAIT status so for this reason i flag every time the socket as SO_REUSEADDR and as SO_LINGER. I have ~200 open ports in time wait after 3/4 hours of running this app.
Is it correct? Should i follow another, maybe, simpler way? Thanks all! ;)

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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you just checking for web server existence, there is no reason to send anything: connect() alone is enough to ensure target is alive at least on network stack level.

To be extra sure about target state you can ask something useful from web server and check result. It will put slightly more load on server but can be done with single connection, if server supports persistent HTTP connections. You better use some HTTP client library is this case: correctly implementing client-side may be tricky.

TIME_WAIT is ok, it's normal condition and this states will gradually timeout.

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Thanks for the answer. I don't need to check the web-server state. I just need to know that the target is connected or not. Is connect() enough in your opinion? I want to avoid false-positive situation in which the connect() return an error while the target is perfectly reachable. Moreover, do you think that the current implementation (create and destroy every time the socket) is correct? What will happen when the O.S. will assign the emphemeral port 65536? Will it correctly restart from a lower port or hangs? Thanks :) –  CrAsHeR Sep 29 '11 at 15:52
    
I don't really understand how you can recognise false connect errors from true ones. The only way I can imagine is to ignore first few errors and report a problem only when certain threshold reached. After connect was successful, send will not return error anyway, only if web server immediately closed connection. As for port space exhaustion - do not forget to clean up your sockets and system will do just fine. One connection per second is a pretty low load and will be handled easily. –  blaze Sep 30 '11 at 7:53
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