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A new feature in C# / .NET 4.0 is that you can change your enumerable in a foreach without getting the exception. See Paul Jackson's blog entry An Interesting Side-Effect of Concurrency: Removing Items from a Collection While Enumerating for information on this change.

What is the best way to do the following?

foreach(var item in Enumerable)
{
    foreach(var item2 in item.Enumerable)
    {
        item.Add(new item2)
    }
}

Usually I use an IList as a cache/buffer until the end of the foreach, but is there better way?

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1  
Hmm.. Can you point us to documentation of this change? Enumerables have always been immutable when enumerating over the collection. –  CraigTP Apr 17 '09 at 11:23
    
This is a variation on the theme that prompted Steve McConnell to advise never to monkey with the loop index. –  Ed Guiness Apr 17 '09 at 12:49
2  
Change on .NET 4.0 lovethedot.net/2009/03/… –  Polo Apr 17 '09 at 13:55
    
Thanks for the link! But, I wonder, were you asking how to do this with or without this new functionality? I'm guessing without, since you accepted my answer, but I'm a little confused. –  Rik Apr 17 '09 at 15:01
1  
I know I'm digging up a very old conversation here, but I'd be extremely careful with this. Only the new concurrent collections are modifiable within foreach - all the previous collection types, and I imagine the majority of future collection types too, will still be immutable while enumerating over them. Making extensive use of this quirk would effectively lock you into using the concurrent collections, because if you wanted to use a different collection in the future all of your quirky foreach loops would suddenly break. –  Chris Aug 1 '12 at 14:13

7 Answers 7

up vote 27 down vote accepted

The collection used in foreach is immutable. This is very much by design.

As it says on MSDN:

The foreach statement is used to iterate through the collection to get the information that you want, but can not be used to add or remove items from the source collection to avoid unpredictable side effects. If you need to add or remove items from the source collection, use a for loop.

The post in the link provided by Poko indicates that this is allowed in the new concurrent collections.

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6  
You're answer doesn't really answer the question. He knows that the basic foreach loop is immutable... he wants to know the best way to apply changes to an enumerable collection. –  Josh G Apr 17 '09 at 12:46
10  
Then the answer is: use a regular for-loop, as suggested in the quote. I am aware that the OP mentions this behavior changes in C# 4.0, but I can't find any information on that. For now, I think this is still a relevant answer. –  Rik Apr 17 '09 at 12:51
2  
lovethedot.net/2009/03/… –  Polo Apr 17 '09 at 13:54

Make a copy of the enumeration, using an IEnumerable extension method in this case, and enumerate over it. This would add a copy of every element in every inner enumerable to that enumeration.

foreach(var item in Enumerable)
{
    foreach(var item2 in item.Enumerable.ToList())
    {
        item.Add(item2)
    }
}
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As mentioned, but with a code sample:

foreach(var item in collection.ToArray())
    collection.Add(new Item...);
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Here's how you can do that (quick and dirty solution. If you really need this kind of behavior, you should either reconsider your design or override all IList<T> members and aggregate the source list):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace ConsoleApplication3
{
    public class ModifiableList<T> : List<T>
    {
        private readonly IList<T> pendingAdditions = new List<T>();
        private int activeEnumerators = 0;

        public ModifiableList(IEnumerable<T> collection) : base(collection)
        {
        }

        public ModifiableList()
        {
        }

        public new void Add(T t)
        {
            if(activeEnumerators == 0)
                base.Add(t);
            else
                pendingAdditions.Add(t);
        }

        public new IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
        {
            ++activeEnumerators;

            foreach(T t in ((IList<T>)this))
                yield return t;

            --activeEnumerators;

            AddRange(pendingAdditions);
            pendingAdditions.Clear();
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            ModifiableList<int> ints = new ModifiableList<int>(new int[] { 2, 4, 6, 8 });

            foreach(int i in ints)
                ints.Add(i * 2);

            foreach(int i in ints)
                Console.WriteLine(i * 2);
        }
    }
}
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The best approach from a performance perspective is probably to use a one or two arrays. Copy the list to an array, do operations on the array, and then build a new list from the array. Accessing an array element is faster than accessing a list item, and conversions between a List<T> and a T[] can use a fast "bulk copy" operation which avoids the overhead associated accessing individual items.

For example, suppose you have a List<string> and wish to have every string in the list which starts with T be followed by an item "Boo", while every string that starts with "U" is dropped entirely. An optimal approach would probably be something like:

int srcPtr,destPtr;
string[] arr;

srcPtr = theList.Count;
arr = new string[srcPtr*2];
theList.CopyTo(arr, theList.Count); // Copy into second half of the array
destPtr = 0;
for (; srcPtr < arr.Length; srcPtr++)
{
  string st = arr[srcPtr];
  char ch = (st ?? "!")[0]; // Get first character of string, or "!" if empty
  if (ch != 'U')
    arr[destPtr++] = st;
  if (ch == 'T')
    arr[destPtr++] = "Boo";
}
if (destPtr > arr.Length/2) // More than half of dest. array is used
{
  theList = new List<String>(arr); // Adds extra elements
  if (destPtr != arr.Length)
    theList.RemoveRange(destPtr, arr.Length-destPtr); // Chop to proper length
}
else
{
  Array.Resize(ref arr, destPtr);
  theList = new List<String>(arr); // Adds extra elements
}

It would have been helpful if List<T> provided a method to construct a list from a portion of an array, but I'm unaware of any efficient method for doing so. Still, operations on arrays are pretty fast. Of note is the fact that adding and removing items from the list does not require "pushing" around other items; each item gets written directly to its appropriate spot in the array.

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You should really use for() instead of foreach() in this case.

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That will potentially clutter code with one more variable which will hold the original number of elements in collection. –  Anton Gogolev Apr 17 '09 at 10:53
2  
If you are changing the length of the collection, then you want your for loop to be evaluated against the new length, not the original or you could get an out of range exception –  cjk Apr 17 '09 at 10:56
    
@Anton: You will need that extra variable, because you'll have to manage the iteration yourself when the collection is modified –  Rik Apr 17 '09 at 11:19
    
@Nippysaurus: Sounds great, and I agree with you in theory, but some collections can't be indexed. You have to iterate over them. –  Josh G Apr 17 '09 at 12:11

You can't change the enumerable collection while it is being enumerated, so you will have to make your changes before or after enumerating.

The for loop is a nice alternative, but if your IEnumerable collection does not implement ICollection, it is not possible.

Either:

1) Copy collection first. Enumerate the copied collection and change the original collection during the enumeration. (@tvanfosson)

or

2) Keep a list of changes and commit them after the enumeration.

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