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I'm writing a mobile app in PhoneGap, but there seems to be an issue with Webkit and its ability to remove event listeners from its event list when there's a scope context change on the callback. Below is an example:

Function.prototype.bind = function(scope) {
    var fn = this;
    return function () {
        fn.apply(scope, arguments);
    };
};

a = function(){};
a.prototype.tmp = function(e){
    var tmp = ddd.q('#tmp');
    tmp.className = 'active';
    tmp.addEventListener('webkitAnimationEnd',this.tmp2.bind([this,tmp]),false);
}
a.prototype.tmp2 = function(e){
    this[1].removeEventListener('webkitAnimationEnd',this[0].tmp2.bind([this[0],this[1]]),false);
    this[1].className = 'inactive;
    var t2 = ddd.q('#tmp2');
    t2.className = 'active';
    t2.addEventListener('webkitAnimationEnd',this[0].setStart.bind([this,t2]),false);
};

Now, in the above code, the event listeners never peel off, and whenever the callback gets invoked, the event listener list becomes rather large -- as demonstrated in Web Inspector. Any ideas on how to remove event listeners when they're done using callbacks that change function scope?

share|improve this question
    
Are you using bind correctly? Should it be .bind(this, arg1, arg2, ...) so you avoid having this being an array? –  Paul Grime Sep 29 '11 at 16:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Can you use something like this jsfiddle example? this is the object on which the click event is fired. self is the A object.

Function.prototype.bind = Function.prototype.bind || function(scope) {
    var fn = this;
    return function () {
        fn.apply(scope, arguments);
    };
};

A = function() {};
A.prototype.click = function (el) {
    var self = this;
    var onClick = function () {
        el.removeEventListener('click', onClick, false);
        alert("this=" + this + "\nself=" + self + "\nel=" + el + "\nclicked");
    }
    el.addEventListener('click', onClick, false);
}
A.prototype.toString = function () {
    return "I am an A!";
}

a = new A();
a.click(document.getElementById("a1"));
a.click(document.getElementById("a2"));

Update 1 - second example is here. Major differences below.

function createOnClickHandler (scope, outerThis, el) {
    var onClick = (function (evt) {
        el.removeEventListener('click', onClick, false);
        alert("this=" + this + "\nouterThis=" + outerThis + ", \nel=" + el + "\nclicked");
    }).bind(scope);
    return onClick;
}

A = function() {};
A.prototype.click = function (el) {
    var ob = {
        toString: function () {
            return "I am an ob!";
        }
    };
    el.addEventListener('click', createOnClickHandler(ob, this, el), false);
}

Update 2 - general example of a one-time event handler that binds your event handler to a particular scope, calls that handler, and unregisters the listener.

function createOneTimeHandler (evtName, fn, scope, el) {
    var bound = fn.bind(scope);
    var onEvent = function (evt) {
        el.removeEventListener(evtName, onEvent, false);
        bound(evt);
    };
    el.addEventListener(evtName, onEvent, false);
}
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't necessarily solve this issue. The problem is that I have to change scope, and often to something that's not within the object context. It's a groovy idea, but it's not applicable in this case. I'll play around with it and see how it flies; however, I still need a more general use-case to remove event listeners where I change scope. –  Chuckie B Sep 30 '11 at 1:24
    
Ok, I think I get what you're saying, so have added a 2nd example that binds to a completely new object. –  Paul Grime Sep 30 '11 at 9:24

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