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I know how to get this code to work, but I'm curious why the compiler is not able to figure out that the call is to the outer class method:

public class Example {
    public void doSomething(int a, int b)
    {
    }

    public class Request
    {
        public int a;
        public int b;

        public void doSomething()
        {
            doSomething(a,b); // Error. Fix: Example.this.doSomething(a,b);
        }
    }
}

Is there a deeper design reason for this than protecting coders from making mistakes?

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both can be public –  Ray Tayek Sep 29 '11 at 17:05
    
Whoa, that's something I haven't come across for a while and I feel ashamed for that :) I clearly remember statements like there could be only one top-level public class per source file, but that was about top-level ones... Sorry about that, gotta delete this misleading comment. –  jFrenetic Sep 29 '11 at 17:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

By the language definition, the outer-class method is not visible in the inner class because it is shadowed.

Shadowing is based on name rather than signature. This is a good thing.

Consider the alternative. You could hide a subset of method overloads. Someone else could try to change the arguments in a call, to call one of the other overloaded methods. Simply changing the arguments could cause the recipient object to change. This would be surprising, and could cost time to debug.

From the Java Language Specification, 6.3.1:

Some declarations may be shadowed in part of their scope by another declaration of the same name, in which case a simple name cannot be used to refer to the declared entity. A declaration d of a type named n shadows the declarations of any other types named n that are in scope at the point where d occurs throughout the scope of d.

...

A declaration d is said to be visible at point p in a program if the scope of d includes p, and d is not shadowed by any other declaration at p. When the program point we are discussing is clear from context, we will often simply say that a declaration is visible.

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Obviously, if you had name-and-signature matches in the Inner and Outer class, and you renamed the inner class method, you'd have the same risk - you might fail to refactor all your old calls to the new name. However, there is no language-design way for the Java compiler to protect against that type of problem, so I guess this rule is "the best you can do" to protect against such refactoring errors. –  Thomas Andrews Sep 29 '11 at 19:52
    
That's a good point. I personally almost always use automated refactoring for changing names, partly to prevent that error. –  Andy Thomas Sep 29 '11 at 21:43
    
Nice answer +1. –  Amir Afghani Sep 30 '11 at 2:55

This will work :

public class Example {
    public void doSomething(final int a, final int b) {
    }

    public class Request {
        public int a;
        public int b;

        public void foo() {
            doSomething(a, b); // Error. Fix: Example.this.doSomething(a,b);
        }
    }
}

You have a namespace collision on the function name doSomething, hence the need to qualify.

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Qualifying the call as shown in the question would also solve the problem. The methods have the same name, but different signatures, hence the question. –  Andy Thomas Sep 29 '11 at 17:15
    
I don't think the arguments alone can distinguish the methods. –  Amir Afghani Sep 29 '11 at 17:17
    
The question is why. We're accustomed to seeing an overloaded method picked by the arguments in a call, so why doesn't it work with these two methods in the same scope? See my answer if interested. –  Andy Thomas Sep 29 '11 at 17:24
    
It's certainly possible for the compiler to disambiguate the original code, so, as Andy says, the question is "why?" –  Thomas Andrews Sep 29 '11 at 18:07

Inner classes do not by default inherit from their corresponding outer class.

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So? This compiles fine if the names of the methods are not the same, so inheritance has nothing to do with it. –  Thomas Andrews Sep 29 '11 at 18:06
    
Really? hmm.... –  simplyianm Sep 29 '11 at 18:13

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