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what will be the output of the below given query, if no matching records are found

select avg(salary) from employee where dept='sales'

Will it return 0 or null ?

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Might be worth trying :) –  dfb Sep 29 '11 at 17:27
    
It may vary based on RDBMS (not specified). Try it and find out. –  David Stratton Sep 29 '11 at 17:28
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It returns null: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/group-by-functions.html#function_avg

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Ok I have gone through the docs and it mentions over there that if there are no matching rows then it would give NULL. But what if there are matching rows and the salary column contains NULL value ?? Will it ignore the NULL value and return 0 in this case ?? –  4zh4r Sep 29 '11 at 17:46
    
Yes I think it will ignore null value. –  purple Sep 29 '11 at 17:49
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Have a look at this.

It returns NULL

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Easy test in SQL Server:

DECLARE @T TABLE (id int)
INSERT INTO @T
SELECT NULL

SELECT AVG(id) FROM @T

Returns NULL

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By default in MySQL and i'm pretty sure it is too in MSSQL, all aggregation functions return NULL if no data or if ANY OF THE DATA IS NULL, you cannot compute an aggregation on missing data.

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-1 This is wrong. Rows that are NULL are ignored.; also some aggregations functions (eg: COUNT()) will return 0 if no matching rows are found. –  NullUserException Sep 29 '11 at 17:29
    
This is very very very wrong. –  JNK Sep 29 '11 at 17:34
    
Sorry about that, i mixed up expressions and agregations... If you put NULLS in for example SELECT 1+NULL it returns null. I was confused :D –  Mathieu Dumoulin Sep 29 '11 at 18:40
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