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I've just migrated and deployed my first Azure Web Role this week and now that the pressure is off to get it deployed I'm reading "Azure in Action" and after reading about configuration settings the whole thing rubs me the wrong way.

This seems fine for migrating AppSettings type configuration settings. However, what about settings in system.web, system.webServer and system.webService or other more complex configuration systems. If I want to be able to modify my WCF configuration settings my current options are:

  1. Make the change and do a full deploy (build, upload to staging, switch VIP)
  2. Extend WCF thru a custom behavior or whatnot to use the Service Config (cscfg) instead.

I thought maybe I was misunderstanding the use - like the examples were simply the very naive case and that in practice they were used differently. However, after googling for a while it seems that this is exactly how everyone is doing it. For example, instead of using the connectionStrings configuration element for Entity Framework connections I have to write a custom connection factory.

This not only seems like too much work, but it ties my entire configuration implementation to Azure. Yes, I can use an interface so I can abstract the details and replace the implementation if I need to. But I still don't like all the extra work, connectionStrings are simple, but there are much more complex things to override.

What I'm thinking is that I should be able to do is read the Service Configuration at startup and use the ConfigurationManager to update my web.config. If something changes at runtime then again, I can update web.config. This way my application is still portable and I'm not hardwired to the Azure configuration system.

Does anyone agree? Or is it just me?

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closed as not constructive by Bill the Lizard Sep 30 '11 at 12:43

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This is a subjective question, and sort of an "AMIRITE?" question. It's not really appropriate for this site. –  Joshua Carmody Sep 29 '11 at 20:30

2 Answers 2

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What I'm thinking is that I should be able to do is read the Service Configuration at startup and use the ConfigurationManager to update my web.config. If something changes at runtime then again, I can update web.config. This way my application is still portable and I'm not hardwired to the Azure configuration system.

In that case, what would happen if Azure restarted your role? The configuration would revert to that in the Service Configuration. If you're running multiple instances, configuration can then differ between them with potentially dangerous results.

An option is to build (once) a customer configuration provider that picked up settings from somewhere else (such as Table Storage) rather than web.config or .cscfg

With your configuration provider abstracted behind an interface, you can exploit Dependency Injection to provide the appropriate configuration mechanism for your deployment model.

I feel your pain, but it's really only a problem that needs solving once.

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1  
I thought the purpose of Service Configuration is that you can update your settings at runtime and you won't loose them due to a restart? Yes, my web.config looses settings when the role is restarted, but that's why I suggested using the startup hooks to update the web.config when the role starts/restarts. –  Mark J Miller Sep 29 '11 at 18:41
    
I didn't quite pick up that "if something changes" meant that the Service Configuration was changed. My bad. You can handle configuration changes using the RoleEnvironmentChanged hander. The standard behaviour is to restart the roles, but you have the option to catch the changes and act on them your own way. Try codeproject.com/KB/azure/azure-configuration.aspx –  Steve Morgan Sep 29 '11 at 18:45
    
When it comes to updating web.config, remember that the behaviour of ASP.NET is to restart the application if web.config changes. That might be more disruptive than you really want. –  Steve Morgan Sep 29 '11 at 18:47
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Yeah, I did think about restarting ASP.NET. But I was kinda focused on what I didn't like about the Azure model. In looking it seems the recommendation is to move all your config settings to Service Configuration and that just doesn't seem right. So maybe my problem is with the guidance rather than the implementation. Instead the only settings that should be moved are those that you actually have a real need to change at runtime, rather than, "Hey, now I can reconfigure my entire role at runtime". –  Mark J Miller Sep 29 '11 at 18:59
    
I think you've hit the nail fairly squarely on the head there, @Mark. –  Steve Morgan Sep 29 '11 at 19:00

it ties my entire configuration implementation to Azure

For an application to properly take advantage of Azure you'll end up tying much more than just configuration implementation!

For example, table storage is much much faster than SQL Azure, and even with SQL Azure there are differences regarding e.g. the requirement for clustered indexes.

It's worth remembering that unlike virtual hosts, Azure is not an abstraction of Windows Server: it is a platform in its own right, with its strengths and weaknesses.

In the case of configuration settings it's in my view entirely reasonable for them to be relatively hard to change on production boxes. It's obviously a different matter when developing and testing, however; and to that end there's Azure Web Deploy, which lets you do a "disposable" deployment in a few moments.

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