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I am facing a problem selecting the date in SQL Server 2005. The table name is Softskill and the column name is insertdate. The data is stored as 2011-09-22 08:50:28.000 in this format.

To select, I am passing values from the front end as '2011-09-22', I mean the date only.

I tried to use

SELECT INSERTDATE FROM SOFTSKILL WHERE INSERTDATE = '2011-09-22'.

But it is not showing the record. May I know which format the column is following and is there any way to retrieve data by using only date?

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3 Answers 3

You want to search for a range of times that encompass the day. Something like:

SELECT INSERTDATE 
    FROM SOFTSKILL 
    WHERE INSERTDATE >= '2011-09-22 00:00:00'
        AND INSERTDATE < '2011-09-23 00:00:00'

You could also apply functions to INSERTDATE to extract just the date portion, but that will make the query nonsargable.

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Hi i am passing date value from the front end, and i could not able to pass the next date also.. –  NAVEEN KUMAR Sep 29 '11 at 19:07
    
@NAVEENKUMAR: This is just a quick sample. You could compute the next date, right? –  Joe Stefanelli Sep 29 '11 at 19:08
1  
+1 for the word nonsargable –  Ian Nelson Sep 29 '11 at 19:16
SELECT * 
FROM SOFTSKILL 
WHERE DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, InsertDate)) = '2011-09-22'
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This will do what you need

SELECT INSERTDATE 
FROM SOFTSKILL 
WHERE CAST(FLOOR(CAST(INSERTDATE AS FLOAT)) AS DATETIME) = '2011-09-30'

You need to truncate INSERTDATE so its time part is 00:00:00.000; then, it will be equal to '2011-09-30' assuming INSERTDATE is '2011-09-30 XX:XX:XX.xxx'.

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Related useful question about truncating datetime: stackoverflow.com/questions/923295/… –  daniloquio Sep 30 '11 at 22:50

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