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I'm working on a pacman clone in java using eclipse and sometimes it appears laggy more specifically the movement of pacman/ghosts is slow, sometimes its fine. Once it has happened while I was running it so it wasn't after I added code and it doesn't seem to be after any specific event in game. I can't find any trigger or produce the lag on purpose

The resource manager shows the same cpu usage(only around 50%)/memory usage . Aswell the FPS seems to be around 200 consistently through lag and during the periods where it is working well.

Does anyone know what this could be?

Is there any information I left out that could be of use?

edit - I am basing movement on a timer is that bad? I will post the movement relevant code below is there a good way of posting the whole code on here?

Timer movement = new Timer(20, new ActionListener()//500 is time in milliseconds between
      //calls to actionPerformed as far as I know.
    {
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) 
        {
            if(movingUp == true)
            {
                moveUp();
            }
            else if(movingDown == true)
            {
                moveDown();
            }
            else if(movingRight == true)
            {
                moveRight();
            }
            else if(movingLeft == true)
            {
                moveLeft();
            }

        }

    });


public void moveUp()
    {
        yPos -= 1;
        this.rect.y -= 1;
    }

public void setDirUp()
    {
        movingUp = true;
        movingDown = false;
        movingRight = false;
        movingLeft = false;
    }

in the main class in public void keyPressed:

if(keyCode == KeyEvent.VK_W)
        {
            if(pacMan.isUpHittingWall == false)
            {
                pacMan.setDirUp();

                pacMan.isDownHittingWall = false;
                pacMan.isRightHittingWall = false;
                pacMan.isLeftHittingWall = false;
            }

        }

edit 2 -Thanks for the help guys. I have the movement using System time now and it seems to have fixed the issue because I implemented it only for pacman at first and the ghosts were still slow. Now there is an issue where moving right and down are much slower than moving left or up The only difference I see is that right and down are both adding and left and up are subtracting. What can I do about this?

The updated code is below.

//updated movement code
public void moveUp(long timePassed)
    {
        yPos -= vy * timePassed;
        this.rect.y -= vy * timePassed;
    }

    public void moveDown(long timePassed)
    {
        yPos += vy * timePassed;
        this.rect.y += vy * timePassed;
    }

    public void moveRight(long timePassed)
    {
        xPos += vx * timePassed;
        this.rect.x += vx * timePassed;
    }

    public void moveLeft(long timePassed)
    {
        xPos -= vx * timePassed;
        this.rect.x -= vx * timePassed;
    }


//I passed timePassed through a globalInputObject because my input is handled in public //void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) and I didnt know how else to get timePassed in to the //movement method

//Here is the code in gameLoop()
                 globalInputObject.isPacManMovingUp(timePassed);
             globalInputObject.isPacManMovingDown(timePassed);
             globalInputObject.isPacManMovingRight(timePassed);
         globalInputObject.isPacManMovingLeft(timePassed);




//This is inside the GlobalInputObject
public void isPacManMovingUp(long timePassed)
    {
        if(pacMan.movingUp == true)
        {
            pacMan.moveUp(timePassed);
        }
    }

    public void isPacManMovingDown(long timePassed)
    {
        if(pacMan.movingDown == true)
        {
            pacMan.moveDown(timePassed);
        }
    }

    public void isPacManMovingRight(long timePassed)
    {
        if(pacMan.movingRight == true)
        {
            pacMan.moveRight(timePassed);
        }
    }

    public void isPacManMovingLeft(long timePassed)
    {
        if(pacMan.movingLeft == true)
        {
            pacMan.moveLeft(timePassed);
        }
    }
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Garbage collection? –  CanSpice Sep 29 '11 at 19:42
1  
Something somewhere in your code is allowing the lag. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 29 '11 at 19:42
2  
Do you want specific advice on how to make your game smoother, or do you want general advice on optimization? If you want specific advice, we'll need more information. –  skyuzo Sep 29 '11 at 19:42
    
@HovercraftFullOfEels: O rly? –  Blender Sep 29 '11 at 19:44
1  
@Blender: really. He's asking about code optimization but not showing code. For all we know he's basing movement distance on a Timer and not on the system clock, but without code, who knows? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 29 '11 at 19:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Rather than always moving the pacman by a constant distance (1 pixel, it appears) each time the timer runs, you should:

  1. Set the timer to run as fast as possible (e.g. once every millisecond or less). Edit: if you set it too fast, the game may end up actually running slower, you'll have to experiment.
  2. Calculate how much time has passed between each frame using the system clock and move the pacman by an amount proportional to that.

Doing the above will mean that if the system is "laggy," it will simply show fewer frames per second, rather than actually moving everything slower.

share|improve this answer
    
#1 - that would make the game run slower. His game is taking a performance hit because the input thread is executing parallel to his game thread #2 - that's how any animation should work to be honest. Speed is relative to time. So an object moves at x pixels per second and is pointed in y direction. Do the math on the delta since the last frame was rendered to determine where the object should be now. –  Brian Dilley Sep 29 '11 at 22:19

As I feared, you're basing the distance moved on the time chunk from the Timer. You shouldn't do this as all timers can be variable and unreliable, especially with small time chunks. Better to base movement on difference in system time. So yes, use a Timer or something to run your "game loop", but know the sprite's position and velocity using doubles, and calculate the distance to move based on velocity vector (math vector not Java Vector) * difference in system time. That way if the timer is delayed by say garbage collection, making the time chunk larger, the distance moved will be correspondingly greater and will look smoother.

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You should look into creating a proper "main loop" or "game loop" as some call it. Take a look at the game structure part of this wikipedia article.. Basically those input events are happening\invoked from a separate thread than the main thread and they are directly modifying geometry of in game objects. Instead consider something like this for a main loop:

loop:
    process collision detection
    process animation (alters geometry of game objects)
    process input (more on this later)
    any other game specific logic
    render screen

your process input could be something like this

if (globalInputObject.movingUp==true) {
   hero.y -= 10;
}
if (globalInputObject.movingDown==true) {
   hero.y += 10;
}
if (globalInputObject.movingLeft==true) {
   hero.x -= 10;
}
if (globalInputObject.movingRight==true) {
   hero.x += 10;
}

and your input handler would look something like this:

public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent evt) {
    if (evt.button==UP_BUTTON) {
        globalInputObject.movingUp=true;
    }
    if (evt.button==DOWN_BUTTON) {
        globalInputObject.movingDown=true;
    }
    if (evt.button==LEFT_BUTTON) {
        globalInputObject.movingLeft=true;
    }
    if (evt.button==RIGHT_BUTTON) {
        globalInputObject.movingRight=true;
    }

}

Basically the processing that you're doing in your "extra" threads (input thread) is minimal and therefore doesn't interfere with your main thread. Also, this method has the benefied of easily supporting multiple directions simultaneously (ie: UP+RIGHT = diagonal).

Only super high end games have more than a single thread (if they even need it at all). Dealing with synchronisation in a game is not good for performance.

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