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We have a web app depending on the installation of .net framework 1.1. If the user install .net framework 2.0 as an add on or if the user only has .net framework 2.0 installed, certain functionalities are broken resulting in an errormessage starting with :" Message: Request for the permission of type 'system.net.WebPermission,System, Version=2.0.0.0....."

Is there any way i can define that the web app only will use .net framework without modifying the code? Maybe in the web.config of the IIS?

Thanks in advance

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In IIS, go to the ASP.NET tab (folder properties), and change it to 1.x. That should do it.

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Sorry - you could have kept your answer, though - it was still perfectly valid. –  Marc Gravell Apr 17 '09 at 13:23
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Be sure to create a different app pool you cannot run different .net versions in the same app pool –  Robin Day Apr 17 '09 at 13:26
    
@Marc: Not an issue. It would just clutter up. Rep is not that important, considering the cap! –  Mehrdad Afshari Apr 17 '09 at 14:58

You should be able to go to the properties of the website in IIS and specify the version of .Net you'll be running under.

Here's how to get there on the server...

Start Menu>(Right+Mouse+Click)MyComputer>Manage>Services And Applications>IIS>Websites>(Right+Mouse+Click) [your website]>Properties>Asp.Net>Asp.Net Version
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In IIS you can configure a website to use either installed framework:

  1. In IIS, right-click on the website or application, select properties
  2. goto ASP.NET tab
  3. select the ASP.NET version to use
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Thanks, but this was tried earlier. I have selected Version 1.1.4322 –  Ari Apr 17 '09 at 13:45

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