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Consider the following attribute.

internal class NiceAttribute : Attribute
{
  private string _stuff;

  public string Stuff
  {
    set { _stuff = value; }
  }
}

When I try to use the attribute [Nice(Stuff = "test")] the compiler gives the following error.

'Stuff' is not a valid named attribute argument. Named attribute arguments must be fields which are not readonly, static, or const, or read-write properties which are public and not static.

What is the rational behind the requirement for the property to be readable?


Update
I will try to sketch my use case for having write-only properties on attributes.

interface ISettingsBuilder
{
  Settings GetSettings();
}

class SettingsAttribute : Attribute, ISettingsBuilder
{
  private readonly IDictionary<string, object> _settings =
    new Dictionary<string, object>();

  public Settings GetSettings()
  {
    // Use _settings to create an immutable instance of Settings
  }

  public string Stuff
  {
    set { _settings["Stuff"] = value; }
  }

  // More properties ...
}

There may be other implementations of ISettingsBuilder. For example one that offers a nice API to build settings through code.

I ended up with implementing my getters by throwing a NotImplementedException.

  public string Stuff
  {
    get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    set { _settings["Stuff"] = value; }
  }

Can you think of a nicer way to do something like this?

share|improve this question
    
Now would be a good time for John Skeet or Eric Lippert to show up. I happen to just have seen a glimps of Jon Skeet editing a tag :) –  sehe Sep 29 '11 at 22:39
3  
I don't have a good answer, but why would you want it to not be readable? –  µBio Sep 29 '11 at 22:41
    
@µBio: because it doesn't need to be? The attribute can read the backing store. It is called, encapsulation, if you will. –  sehe Sep 29 '11 at 22:44
2  
@sehe: I looked, I checked the spec, I upvoted... the spec states it has to be, but doesn't give any rationale. –  Jon Skeet Sep 29 '11 at 22:47
    
Could it have something to do with the way the "named parameters" work? It was the only named parameters we had before C# 4.0 and the implementation of that might force this behaviour since they probably create the instance and then set the properties/fields. Therefore they cannot be readonly, static nor const. And if it's a property it has to have a setter. Or something. –  Mikael Östberg Sep 29 '11 at 22:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I suspect the compiler is using a slightly misguided check to see whether you are accessing a private property here

Edit "we" have now located the actual source. For informational purposes, here is the full breakdown, but feel free to skip to the bottom.
(note how bug should be filed against the Mono compiler. I'll think that one over for a while)

Compiler Error CS0617

'reference' is not a valid named attribute argument. Named attribute arguments must be fields which are not readonly, static or const, or read-write properties which are not static.

An attempt was made to access a private member of an attribute class.

It could seem that it is using some kind of lookup (akin to reflection) to make sure that the getter is accessible and if it isn't, concludes that it must be private.

Which, of course, it doesn't need to be :)

Mono Compatibility:

For fun, observe that the mono compiler has no problem whatsoever accepting this attribute: https://ideone.com/45fCX

Because of Reflection:

Of course it could be that the compiler requires attribute parameters to have reflectable values. If the property wasn't publicly readable, you could only use reflection to 'observe' that the attribute is present, not with what parameter it was initialized.

I don't know exactly, why such a design choicde would have been made, but it does make sense if you factor in reflection usage.

Update @Arun posted the relevant quote that confirms this conjecture (thanks!):

Accessing Attributes Through Reflection Once attributes have been associated with program elements, reflection can be used to query their existence and values. The main reflection methods to query attributes are contained in the System.Reflection.MemberInfo class (GetCustomAttributes family of methods).

So the reason must be: Attribute parameters must have reflectible values

Prize question: How does that work with positional parameters? How would one reflect those?

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+1 for your update and +1 on the OP, it made me do some real searching! On the question of positional parameters, I guess the value passed is used only for construction (hence need not really be a property of the custom "attribute" being created). I doubt it will get "reflected" unless property methods are defined. –  Arun Sep 29 '11 at 23:37

This link is a reference from Visual Studio 2003, but I guess it hardly changed.

Relevant portion from that link:

Accessing Attributes Through Reflection Once attributes have been associated with program elements, reflection can be used to query their existence and values. The main reflection methods to query attributes are contained in the System.Reflection.MemberInfo class (GetCustomAttributes family of methods).

share|improve this answer
    
Sweet Potatoes. That is a very helpful complementary quote. +1. Now... I'm thinking. How does that work with positional parameters? How would one reflect those? –  sehe Sep 29 '11 at 23:13

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