Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I currently use these two functions to pack and read bits in a byte array. Wondering if anybody has any better ideas or faster ways to do it?

Edited the program with a few more optimization and tabled a few calculations. Currently 100mil Put and Get takes about 12 secs instead of 16 secs now.

If anybody is using the current code make sure the value passed in to Put is a positive number as it's expecting unsigned numbers coming down. If there is interest I can put up signed and unsigned versions.

class BitData
{
    static void Put(byte Data[], final int BitOffset, int NumBits, final int Value)
    {
        final long valLong=(Value&((1L<<NumBits)-1L));
        int posByte=BitOffset>>3;
        int posBit=BitOffset&7;
        int valByte;
        int ModifyBits;

        long lValue;
        int LeftShift;
        ModifyBits=8-posBit;
        if(NumBits<ModifyBits) ModifyBits=NumBits;
        LeftShift=(8-posBit-ModifyBits);
        while(true)
        {
            valByte = Data[posByte];
            if(ModifyBits==8)
            {
                lValue=valLong<<(32-NumBits)>>(24);
                Data[posByte]=(byte)lValue;
            }
            else
            {   
                lValue=valLong<<(32-NumBits)>>(32-ModifyBits)<<LeftShift;
                Data[posByte]=(byte)((valByte & ~(((1<<ModifyBits)-1) << LeftShift)) | lValue);
            }
            NumBits-=ModifyBits;
            if(NumBits==0) break;
            posByte++;          
            ModifyBits=8;
            if(NumBits<ModifyBits) 
            {
                ModifyBits=NumBits;
                LeftShift=(8-ModifyBits);
            }
        }
    }

    static int GetInt(byte Data[], final int BitOffset, int NumBits)
    {       
        int posByte=BitOffset>>3;
        int posBit=BitOffset&7;


        long Value=0;
        int ModifyBits;
        int valByte;
        int LeftShift;
        ModifyBits=8-posBit;
        if(NumBits<ModifyBits) ModifyBits=NumBits;
        LeftShift=(8-posBit-ModifyBits);
        while(true)
        {
            valByte = Data[posByte] & 0xff;
            if(ModifyBits==8) Value+=valByte;
            else Value+=(valByte & ((1<<ModifyBits)-1) << LeftShift) >> LeftShift;              
            NumBits-=ModifyBits;
            if(NumBits==0) break;
            posByte++;
            ModifyBits=8;
            if(NumBits<ModifyBits) 
            {
                ModifyBits=NumBits;
                LeftShift=(8-ModifyBits);
            }
            Value<<=ModifyBits;

        }
        return (int)Value;
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Have you considered using the built-in java.util.BitSet? –  Jim Garrison Sep 30 '11 at 0:24
    
Yea tried that first. It was alot slower than this method. It's a server that needs to pack and unpack possibly millions of packets per second so need the fastest possible way to do it. I've done as much optimizations as I could with these two function. Just curious if there is a totally different route I haven't thought of in Java. –  user972178 Sep 30 '11 at 0:29
    
Yes. Write it in C and use JNI to interface it to Java. –  Jim Garrison Sep 30 '11 at 0:32
    
The program needs to be portable also. I'm not familiar with JNI. Can you tell me if the program can still be run on different os servers if I go that route? –  user972178 Sep 30 '11 at 0:36
    
I don't know much about JNI. Since the JNI code wouldn't be doing any I/O or interacting with the OS I would expect the differences to be very, very minor. You might get away with one source but would need to distribute a binary for each OS/Hardware combination. –  Jim Garrison Sep 30 '11 at 0:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A totally different route would be to define static table of all possible combinations and perform a lookup instead of calculating results each time. I think thats how they do it in cryptography. array[i] x 3 should be much faster than numBits bitwise operations. It will occupy some heap though.

share|improve this answer
    
Will try and table some parts to see if there is a speed increase. –  user972178 Sep 30 '11 at 4:06
1  
The two tables I added seemed to improve performance by about 7-10 percent. Can't find anything else in the code that is fit to table. 10 percent gain is still nice. –  user972178 Sep 30 '11 at 8:11
    
Nice, thanks for sharing! –  mazaneicha Oct 1 '11 at 13:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.