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I'm trying to make a query which brings back results based on a timestamp, say an interval of 30 minutes.

So what I figured out is that I can

SELECT * FROM x WHERE ts BETWEEN timestamp(now()-3000) AND timestamp(now())

So this will query everything from x with timestamps in column ts within the last 30 minutes.

However, this only works after now() is past the yyyy-mm-dd HH:30:00 mark because anytime before it will result in NULL... this is rather cumbersome and I don't understand why it won't just subtract the friggin minutes from the hour!

Please help me out! I couldn't find any other method of doing a query within the last 30 minutes, that is what I'm trying to achieve.

Best regards,

John

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6 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted
SELECT * FROM x WHERE ts BETWEEN timestamp(DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 30 MINUTE)) AND timestamp(NOW())
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Worked great! Thanks for putting it in my original example format. –  Theveloper Sep 30 '11 at 3:44
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How about accepting the answer then? –  mluebke Oct 3 '11 at 21:01
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SELECT * FROM x WHERE ts BETWEEN NOW() - INTERVAL 30 MINUTE AND NOW();
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Thank you this worked perfectly! –  Theveloper Sep 30 '11 at 3:43
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SELECT * FROM (`yourdb`) WHERE `timestamp` BETWEEN NOW() - INTERVAL 30 MINUTE AND NOW();
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SELECT * FROM x 
WHERE ts BETWEEN TIMESTAMPADD(MINUTE, -30, NOW()) AND NOW();
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You'll have to use DATE_ADD() and DATE_SUB() operators for dates. Take a look at the documentation: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/date-and-time-functions.html

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First of all you need to realize that timestamp() returns a unix timestamp in seconds. 3000 seconds is not 30 minutes, it should be 1800 seconds. try that

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Actually when I subtracted 1800 it only subtracted 18 seconds so... –  Theveloper Sep 30 '11 at 3:44
    
@Theveloper ah it should be unix_timestamp, didn't see that part. A timestamp is in a different format that you can't so coherently do math with. –  mugetsu Sep 30 '11 at 17:41
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