Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the following example, I want to define a System.Action which executes a specific method that I define at runtime, but how do I pass the method name (or the method itself) so that the Action method can define the delegate to point to that particular method?

I'm currently getting the following error:

'methodName' is a 'variable' but is used like a 'method'

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace TestDelegate
{
    class Program
    {
        private delegate void WriteHandler(string message);

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<string> words = new List<string>() { "one", "two", "three", "four", "five" };
            Action<string> theFunction = WriteMessage("WriteBasic");

            foreach (string word in words)
            {
                theFunction(word);
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        public static void WriteBasic(string message)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(message);
        }

        public static void WriteAdvanced(string message)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("*** {0} ***", message);
        }

        public static Action<string> WriteMessage(string methodName)
        {
            //gets error: 'methodName' is a 'variable' but is used like a 'method'
            WriteHandler writeIt = new WriteHandler(methodName);

            return new Action<string>(writeIt);
        }

    }
}
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You don't need the Delegate declaration or the WriteMessage method. Try the following:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace TestDelegate
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<string> words = new List<string>() { "one", "two", "three", "four", "five" };
            Action<string> theFunction = WriteBasic;

            foreach (string word in words)
            {
                theFunction(word);
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        public static void WriteBasic(string message)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(message);
        }

        public static void WriteAdvanced(string message)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("*** {0} ***", message);
        }

    }
}

Action is already a delegate so you don't need to make another one.

share|improve this answer

Pass it without quotes -

Action<string> theFunction = WriteMessage(WriteBasic);

Change the signature of "WriteMessage" to -

public static Action<string> WriteMessage(WriteHandler methodName)

Also change the "private" delegate to "public" -

public delegate void WriteHandler(string message); //Edit suggested by Mladen Mihajlovic
share|improve this answer

You can't pass the method like that unless you use reflection. Why not take a WriteHandler as your parameter instead of a string?

share|improve this answer

You could make it work with reflection, but that is not recommended.

Why not make the WriteMessage method take an argument of WriteHandler?

Then you can call it like this (in C# 2+):

WriteMessage(myMethod);
share|improve this answer

You want Delegate.CreateDelegate. In your specific case, you probabaly want Delegate.CreateDelegate(Type,Type,string):

public static Action<string> WriteMessage(string methodName)
{
  return (Action<string>) Delegate.CreateDelegate (
      typeof(Action<string>),
      typeof(Program),
      methodName);
}

However, as Mladen Mihajlovic asked, why do you want to create a delegate based on a string? It would be much easier -- and checked by the compiler! -- to use C#'s support for implicit conversion from methods to delegates of a matching signature.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.