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There is an object type and table consists of that objects. So here we go:

create or replace type lpu.someobj_o as object
(      
  name VARCHAR2(75),     
  enroll_date DATE,
  id NUMBER(12)
)

CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE lpu."SOMEOBJ_T" IS TABLE OF someobj_o;

There's also PL/SQL function that works in common ETL principle. Here is piece of code function:

  for some_cursor_rec in some_cursor(startTime, recordInterval) loop
  open some_cur2(some_cursor_rec.name, some_cursor_rec.id);
  fetch some_cur2 into some_cursor_rec2;
  if some_cur2%rowcount > 0 then
    loop
      pipe row (
        lpu.someobj_o(
        id => some_cursor_rec2.id, 
        name => some_cursor_rec2.name, 
        enroll_date => some_cursor_rec2.enroll_date
      )
      );
      fetch some_cur2 into some_cursor_rec2;
      exit when some_cur2%notfound;
    end loop;      
  end if;
  close some_cur2;
end loop;

Ok, so the issue is small performance. How can I increase speed of completing of this function? I have read that BULK COLLECT should improve performance. But how can I use it in my case? I have tried BULK COLLECT but it gave me error that type of collection is wrong. Thanks in advance! Really hope for your help!

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1  
FETCH Statement with BULK COLLECT Clause? download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E11882_01/appdev.112/e17126/… –  Shannon Severance Sep 30 '11 at 5:23
    
I'm a little skeptical about the benefit of using bulk collect in a pipelined function. Even if you load several rows at once, you still can only pipe one of them to the output at a time. For that matter, unless there's significantly more processing going on in the function, I'd have to question why you're using a pipelined function in the first place. –  Allan Sep 30 '11 at 17:52
    
I can refuse from pipelined functions if it needs for better performance. Do you recommend that for me? –  kseen Oct 1 '11 at 10:04
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2 Answers

If performance is your concern, then you should start looking at combining your two cursors.

Current you are executing the query in the some_cursor once, and you are executing the query in cursor some_cur2 as many times as there are rows selected in the first query. And that's highly likely your performance bottleneck.

If you combine the two queries to one query and do a cursor for loop (which executes the query only once), then you'll automatically be bulk fetching 100 rows at a time, so there probably won't be a real need to manually convert it to do bulk fetching.

Regards,
Rob.

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I have tried one complicated cursor before. And I was getting some performance down-grade with just one cursor. Function finished execution in about 1 second. Now (with two cursors) we have about 0,1 second to go. First cursor would bring about 5-15 records and seconds cursor returns about 40-50 records for each first cursor's record. Any advices, please? –  kseen Oct 1 '11 at 10:02
    
My advice is to post the two cursors and your one cursor, and their plans so we can have a look at them. You can follow the advice in this post: forums.oracle.com/forums/thread.jspa?messageID=1812597 –  Rob van Wijk Oct 1 '11 at 20:07
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Here is a basic example how to use bulk collect into with an object type.

create or replace type someobj_o as object
(      
  name varchar2(75),     
  enroll_date date,
  id number(12)
);
/

create or replace type someobj_t is table of someobj_o;
/

create table someobj_table of someobj_o;

insert into someobj_table values(someobj_o('Joe', current_date, 100));
insert into someobj_table values(someobj_o('Jack', current_date, 101));
insert into someobj_table values(someobj_o('John', current_date, 102));

declare
  v_objs someobj_t;
begin
  select someobj_o(name, enroll_date, id)
    bulk collect into v_objs
    from someobj_table;

  dbms_output.put_line('number of objects in a collection = ' || v_objs.count);
end;
/

Update

The same than above with a cursor:

declare
  type objcur_t is ref cursor;
  v_objcur objcur_t;
  v_objs someobj_t;
begin
  open v_objcur for
    select someobj_o(name, enroll_date, id)
    from someobj_table;

  fetch v_objcur bulk collect into v_objs;

  close v_objcur;

  dbms_output.put_line('number of objects in a collection = ' || v_objs.count);
end;
/
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I saw similar example in the Web. But I exactly need to fill someobj_table from cursor with BULK COLLECT INTO. How can I get this working? –  kseen Sep 30 '11 at 4:39
    
I got types are incompatible error in your edit case. –  kseen Oct 3 '11 at 10:01
    
@kseen: works perfectly on my Oracle 11.2.0.1.0 when I cut and paste the code to SQLPLUS. What Oracle version you are running ? –  user272735 Oct 3 '11 at 12:02
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