Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I have a piece of code that looks like the following:

uint8_t *buffer = <16 MB memory region>
uint32_t count = 1024;
uint32_t position = 0;

uint8_t *get_data() {

    uint8_t *region = buffer + position * 16;

    position += 1;
    position %= count;

    do {
        __sync_synchronize();
    } while (reigon[0] != 1);

    return region;
}

The buffer in question is being written to by a hardware device. At some point (maybe before we started looping, maybe after we've started), the hardware will write to that location, as well as to the rest of the buffer.

I'm currently using __sync_synchronize to issue a memory barrier, because I would like to ensure that there is no way that the compiler would cause the rest of that memory region to be cached from any time before region[0] == 1.

I'm aware that I could mark the entire buffer as volatile. However, I'd like to be able to return a non-volatile buffer from this function.

So, is there any way to do a __sync_synchronize, but only have it target the range of memory that I specify. In this case the memory from [region, region + 1024)?

As an aside, this code is living in userspace. The memory buffer is a pinned region of memory that I've allocated with a kernel module, mapped into userspace, and told a FPGA to eventually DMA to it. This is essentailly attempting to implement a polling mechanism on the FPGA finishing a DMA tranfer.

share|improve this question
    
Is there a problem with casting the region to a volatile uint8_t *? –  Vaughn Cato Sep 30 '11 at 4:09
    
@VaughnCato: I'm fine with doing just about anything within this function. I don't, however, want to change the return value of the function. –  Bill Lynch Sep 30 '11 at 4:14
    
What hardware are you running on? Does your ISA have more specific memory barrier instructions? –  Adam Rosenfield Sep 30 '11 at 4:22
    
@AdamRosenfield: Relatively recent x86_64 hardware. I believe the current machines are Intel. At the low end, this should support something like an Intel Core 2 Duo. –  Bill Lynch Sep 30 '11 at 4:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A region-limited memory fence would be a fairly unusual architectural feature. However, you only need the fence after the loop has terminated:

while (*(volatile uint8_t *)region != 1)
    ;

__sync_synchronize();
return region;
share|improve this answer
    
That's actually a really good point. At the very least I should move to this. –  Bill Lynch Sep 30 '11 at 18:14

This should do the trick:

uint8_t *get_data() {    
    uint8_t *region = buffer + position * 16;
    volatile uint8_t *volatile_region = region;

    position += 1;
    position %= count;

    do {
    } while (volatile_region[0] != 1);

    return region;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Do I have any guarantee that region[1] does not have a cached value from a time before region[0] == 1? –  Bill Lynch Sep 30 '11 at 4:20
    
Also, as an aside. This is more or less what the code used to look like. I was concerned about data corruption because of cached data which is what caused me to add the __sync_synchronize. –  Bill Lynch Sep 30 '11 at 4:21
    
This shouldn't be a problem since you aren't accessing any data through "region" in the same function. –  Vaughn Cato Sep 30 '11 at 4:23
    
strict aliasing doesn't apply to cv-qualifier differences anyway. –  Vaughn Cato Sep 30 '11 at 4:28
    
Isn't a compiler allowed to inline this function, and then reorder the accesses of region and volatile_region as it wants? –  Bill Lynch Sep 30 '11 at 4:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.