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I'm trying to create a simple template class in c++. I've been trying to compile the following but I only get a compile error. This is the code:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

template<int size>
class array {
public:
    int len;
    int data[size];
    array(void) : len(size) {}
    virtual ~array(void) {}
};

int main() {
    array<3> a;
    for (int i=0; i < a.len; ++i) {
        a.data[i] = i;
        printf("%d\n", a.data[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}

This is the error g++-4.2.1 is giving me:

Undefined symbols:
  "__Unwind_Resume", referenced from:
      _main in ccaYob9x.o
ld: symbol(s) not found
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

If we comment out the line for the destructor then the code compiles as it should and it gives me a list of the number 0, 1, 2.

What my ultimate goal is after understanding how template base classes work is to create specialized template classes. I want to create a multidimensional array but I wish to specialize it for the cases when the dimension is 1, 2, and 3. I mainly want to be able to overload the operator() for those cases. In any case, using a template class like this saves me the trouble of allocating memory dynamically when the dimensions are 1, 2, and 3. Does someone know how to change the code to allocate memory dynamically? Doing so will require you to define the destructor, which is the problem I'm currently facing.

EDIT:

I'm not familiar with template specialization. Does someone know how to make a specialized template when size=1, 2 and 3 to have static memory for data and by default to have dynamic memory?

EDIT 2:

It seems that I'm having trouble due to my g++ compiler. Does anyone see anything with with this:

g++ -v
Using built-in specs.
Target: i686-apple-darwin10
Configured with: /var/tmp/gcc/gcc-5666.3~6/src/configure --disable-checking --enable-  werror --prefix=/usr --mandir=/share/man --enable-languages=c,objc,c++,obj-c++ --program-transform-name=/^[cg][^.-]*$/s/$/-4.2/ --with-slibdir=/usr/lib --build=i686-apple-darwin10 --program-prefix=i686-apple-darwin10- --host=x86_64-apple-darwin10 --target=i686-apple- darwin10 --with-gxx-include-dir=/include/c++/4.2.1
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5666) (dot 3)

EDIT 3:

There has got to be something wrong with my g++ version. I just tried it with g++4.0 in the same machine and with the macports version g++-mp-4.3 and it works fine. I guess it is time to upgrade to the next version. Thank you for your answers and hints.

share|improve this question
1  
func(void) is a C-ism, in C++ it would be func() instead. –  K-ballo Sep 30 '11 at 6:31
    
Using bar foo(void); in a declaration is for C. In C++ the correct way is bar foo(); instead. While in C empty parenthesis means "i dont't want to tell you what the parameters are" in C++ the meaning is "there are no parameters". –  6502 Sep 30 '11 at 6:35
    
@K-ballo, I removed the void from both the constructor and destructor but I still get the same compiler error. –  jmlopez Sep 30 '11 at 6:44
    
@6502, see the comment directed to K-ballo. –  jmlopez Sep 30 '11 at 6:44
    
@jmlopez: Yeah, that was not an answer to your question, but a comment on general C++ coding styles. –  K-ballo Sep 30 '11 at 6:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

template<int size>
class array {
public:
    int len;
    int *data;
    array();
    virtual ~array(void);
};

// 1 dimension specialized array 
template <>
array<1>::array() : len(1)
{
    data = new int;
}

template <>
array<1>::~array()
{
    delete data;
}

template <int size>
array<size>::array() : len(size)
{
data = new int[size];
} 

template <int size>
array<size>::~array()
{
delete [] data;
}

int main(int, char)
{
    array<3> a;
    for (int i=0; i < a.len; ++i) {
        a.data[i] = i;
        printf("%d\n", a.data[i]);
    }

    array<1> b;
    for (int i=0; i < b.len; ++i) {
        b.data[i] = i;
        printf("%d\n", b.data[i]);
    }

    return 0;
}

With g++ you will not have compiling errors. You can define specialized operator() for each different array sizes without problems, like constructor and destructor seams.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, you had answer what I had written in the edit a few seconds after I posted it. I tried it in my machine but I still get the same error: Undefined symbols: "__Unwind_Resume". I'm using OS X 10.6 by way. I did try your code in a linux machine with g++ version 4.5.1 and it works. What do I need to do to make it work in my mac? upgrade g++? –  jmlopez Sep 30 '11 at 7:01
    
Sorry, I can't help you about OS X. I don't know if this is an obsolete g++ problem. I don't think so because I'm working with a very old g++ version, exactly (GCC) 4.1.2 20071124 (Red Hat 4.1.2-42). Post your compiling and linking parameters and we'll check them. Perhaps refers to another code portion. –  Tio Pepe Sep 30 '11 at 7:13
    
See edits for info on the g++ installed on my mac. –  jmlopez Sep 30 '11 at 7:26
    
-1: seriously, why do you want to allocate dynamically if the size is known at compile time? and new T[1] would be perfectly fine if you really want dynamic allocation. [edit: -1 removed, just seen the OPs edit] –  phresnel Sep 30 '11 at 7:56

This is not stricly related to the question, but let me give you some int hints about yiour code.

First: decide if you want to use C or C++. Templates are C++, but you are "coding as a C programmer". Not that this is bad by itself, bu it is out out context. (use iostream, not stdlib.h and stdio.h, don't use function(void) but just function()). May be it's not your case, but check also your source doesn't have "C" extension (this may fool the compiler) and use g++ (not gcc) as a command (the library you'll link are different)

Second: pay attention about the use of variables and constant: the inst size as a template parameter, when instantiated is constant. There in no clue in keeping a len variable (in your design, the array size cannot be changed): a static const int len = size is all what you need.

Third: if you really want to test, don't use a single for loop to assign and read values: this makes you completely blind in case of indexes misuse: instead of a.data[i] try the wrong a.data[0] and you'll get exactly the same output. Use a loop to fill the array, followed by another loop to read from it.

Fourth: In C++, scopes are important: keep open and closing braces {} aligned. This may sound pedantic, but saved me soooo many times....

share|improve this answer
    
I am using g++ as my command. the stdlib.h is a bad habit I have. I'll try to get rid of it. I really liked your second point. This is something that I needed at some point but I never figured I could do it the way you mentioned. 3: I usually do that but I was trying to keep the example short. –  jmlopez Sep 30 '11 at 7:15

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