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I'm writing a cross-platform package which need to include different binary file for different platforms (e.g. Linux/MAC OS/Windows and even 32bit/64bit Windows)

I need my package's to install different binary data files based on the platform. The problem is that I need the data files for all platforms to be included in the package where they may have the same name but different content.

Can someone suggest how to do it using distutils / setuptools

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Why do you need different data for each platform? – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Sep 30 '11 at 6:41
I need additional binary files compiled for each platform and don't want to create a source package, as the compilation is very difficult and error prone. So I'll have in the package Win32/file.dll for 32bit windows, Win64/file.dll for 64bit windows and want to deploy it package/file.dll in the end-user's machine. – Uri Cohen Sep 30 '11 at 6:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's not too hard, at least in simple cases: you can for instance see how the of the uncertainties Python package does it (it selects an install directory based on the version of Python, but you would simply check sys.platform and friends, in your case).

The key lines are

if sys.version_info >= (2, 5):
    package_dir = 'uncertainties-py25'
    package_dir = 'uncertainties-py23'


    # Where to find the source code:
    package_dir={'uncertainties': package_dir},
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I think I miss something here... When you do 'python upload', how does it know to upload the content of both uncertainties-py25 and uncertainties-py23 ? – Uri Cohen Sep 30 '11 at 7:07
Both directories are included in the distribution (see…). So, you would include directories for each of your architectures, and the only installs the relevant one. – EOL Sep 30 '11 at 8:02
The missing piece in the puzzle is that both directories are included in (see which include "recursive-include uncertainties-py23 *.py" – Uri Cohen Sep 30 '11 at 11:18

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