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I have been programming in C# for a while and now I want to brush up on my C++ skills.

Having the class:

class Foo
{
    const std::string& name_;
    ...
};

What would be the best approach (I only want to allow read access to the name_ field):

  • use a getter method: inline const std::string& name() const { return name_; }
  • make the field public since it's a constant

Thanks.

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Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/737409/… ? –  jalf Apr 17 '09 at 15:11
    
As an aside, it's more common to use a single leading underscore for member variables in C++. –  Martin Beckett Apr 17 '09 at 15:34
1  
I also thought that the trailing underscore is kind of awkward, but that's what I saw being used in the C++ Faq Lite. –  Alex Apr 18 '09 at 6:20
1  
Thanks. I'll read it :) –  Alex Apr 18 '09 at 23:00
3  
@MartinBeckett Single underscores may be common, but as a partially sighted person I can tell you they are a pain to read. IDEs just love to underline stuff (errors, spelling, etc.) and the underscore get completely obscured by the "helpfulness". To the coding community at large, hear us blind folks, and put an m_ instead of _. –  Wes Miller Apr 30 '13 at 12:35

8 Answers 8

up vote 24 down vote accepted

It tends to be a bad idea to make non-const fields public because it then becomes hard to force error checking constraints and/or add side-effects to value changes in the future.

In your case, you have a const field, so the above issues are not a problem. The main downside of making it a public field is that you're locking down the underlying implementation. For example, if in the future you wanted to change the internal representation to a C-string or a Unicode string, or something else, then you'd break all the client code. With a gettor, you could convert to the legacy representation for existing clients while providing the newer functionality to new users via a new gettor.

I'd still suggest having a getter method like the one you have placed above. This will maximize your future flexibility.

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If I change from a function that returns a std::string to a function that returns some Unicode string, I'm breaking all client code already. –  David Stone Apr 23 '12 at 23:39
4  
..what if your internal representation was Unicode, but you could convert to UTF8 for compatibility with existing clients? A getter method could do the conversion, but a public field would prohibit this pattern. –  JBRWilkinson May 8 '12 at 13:07

Using a getter method is a better design choice for a long-lived class as it allows you to replace the getter method with something more complicated in the future. Although this seems less likely to be needed for a const value, the cost is low and the possible benefits are large.

As an aside, in C++, it's an especially good idea to give both the getter and setter for a member the same name, since in the future you can then actually change the the pair of methods:

class Foo {
public:
    std::string const& name() const;          // Getter
    void name(std::string const& newName);    // Setter
    ...
};

Into a single, public member variable that defines an operator()() for each:

// This class encapsulates a fancier type of name
class fancy_name {
public:
    // Getter
    std::string const& operator()() const {
        return _compute_fancy_name();    // Does some internal work
    }

    // Setter
    void operator()(std::string const& newName) {
        _set_fancy_name(newName);        // Does some internal work
    }
    ...
};

class Foo {
public:
    fancy_name name;
    ...
};

The client code will need to be recompiled of course, but no syntax changes are required! Obviously, this transformation works just as well for const values, in which only a getter is needed.

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1  
Hey, I found your answer before posting my question... it seems to be nearly exactly the same and it appears that you're proposing the type of solution I'm looking for but being a noob I can't be sure. Would you mind having a look at my question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/8454887/… and letting me know if this answer is on the right track for what I'd like to accomplish? –  Technik Empire Dec 10 '11 at 7:08

As an aside, in C++, it is somewhat odd to have a const reference member. You have to assign it in the constructor list. Who owns the actually memory of that object and what is it's lifetime?

As for style, I agree with the others that you don't want to expose your privates. :-) I like this pattern for setters/getters

class Foo
{
public:
  const string& FirstName() const;
  Foo& FirstName(const string& newFirstName);

  const string& LastName() const;
  Foo& LastName(const string& newLastName);

  const string& Title() const;
  Foo& Title(const string& newTitle);
};

This way you can do something like:

Foo f;
f.FirstName("Jim").LastName("Bob").Title("Programmer");
share|improve this answer
1  
You should make the getter functions themselves "const", too. –  Bernhard Kausler Nov 25 '10 at 14:48
1  
@Bernhard, thanks. Changed. –  chrish Dec 3 '10 at 15:48
1  
Although it reads and writes well, method chaining ('fluent') API style carries some overhead: stackoverflow.com/q/3134416/102345 –  JBRWilkinson May 8 '12 at 13:12

Even though the name is immutable, you may still want to have the option of computing it rather than storing it in a field. (I realize this is unlikely for "name", but let's aim for the general case.) For that reason, even constant fields are best wrapped inside of getters:

class Foo {
    public:
        const std::string& getName() const {return name_;}
    private:
        const std::string& name_;
};

Note that if you were to change getName() to return a computed value, it couldn't return const ref. That's ok, because it won't require any changes to the callers (modulo recompilation.)

share|improve this answer
1  
So let me resummarize this answer: 1) it is highly unlikely that you'll ever change the implementation of getName(), because... hell, the data is just stored, how in the world you will be recomputing it every time it's accessed? You are using C++ for performance, aren't you? and 2) in the end, even if you would really come up with such a crazy usecase, you won't actually be able to do that, because it's impossible to return a const ref without triggering undefined behavior. Are you convinced yet? –  ulidtko Mar 19 '12 at 2:21
    
ulidtko, based on your "tone of voice" here, I doubt that any answer I give you could mollify you. However, let me point out one thing: I wrote "Note that if you were to change getName() to return a computed value, it couldn't return const ref. That's ok, because it won't require any changes to the callers (modulo recompilation.)" In other words, you'd have to change the method from const std::string& getName() const to std::string getName() const. Of course, changing an inline function, or a field, always requires recompilation, so this doesn't increase the compile-time burden. –  Dan Breslau Mar 20 '12 at 1:39
    
your note here is correct. You could profit from some smart pointers too, probably. However it is true that I have an opinion on getters and setters in C++, and I'm collecting arguments for, and against it. –  ulidtko Mar 20 '12 at 8:12
    
Regarding this argument for getters (i.e. an option to switch to recomputing the value instead of returning it stored) I can make the following objection: almost certainly by recomputing the value in getter you'll be breaking a contract. Most of the clients will rely on certain "intuitive" properties of getters: that they're fast, they don't throw, they don't allocate, should be threadsafe, etc. You may get lucky and everything will still work with your untrivial getter, but programming isn't about luck. –  ulidtko Mar 20 '12 at 8:20
    
I agree with you that sometimes a caller may be relying on a getter running essentially as quickly as accessing a field. In some circles, this is used as an argument against language support for transparent getters. I'm sympathetic to the idea of an implicit performance contract, but I think a bit of caveat emptor applies as well: If the developer uses accessors, they're reserving the right to change the implementation. And if they didn't explicitly promise constant-time access, then you shouldn't write code that assumes constant-time access. –  Dan Breslau Mar 21 '12 at 18:18

Avoid public variables, except for classes that are essentially C-style structs. It's just not a good practice to get into.

Once you've defined the class interface, you might never be able to change it (other than adding to it), because people will build on it and rely on it. Making a variable public means that you need to have that variable, and you need to make sure it has what the user needs.

Now, if you use a getter, you're promising to supply some information, which is currently kept in that variable. If the situation changes, and you'd rather not maintain that variable all the time, you can change the access. If the requirements change (and I've seen some pretty odd requirements changes), and you mostly need the name that's in this variable but sometimes the one in that variable, you can just change the getter. If you made the variable public, you'd be stuck with it.

This won't always happen, but I find it a lot easier just to write a quick getter than to analyze the situation to see if I'd regret making the variable public (and risk being wrong later).

Making member variables private is a good habit to get into. Any shop that has code standards is probably going to forbid making the occasional member variable public, and any shop with code reviews is likely to criticize you for it.

Whenever it really doesn't matter for ease of writing, get into the safer habit.

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I tend to disagree, because with a public field the "changed requirements" situation is not that fatal: you could still use some templates, inheritance and operator= to simulate a property in C++. And actually most of the time you won't need this (seriously, how many times did you do nontrivial getters or setters?), while the client syntax of get()/set() is just ugly. –  ulidtko Mar 19 '12 at 3:07

I think the C++11 approach would be more like this now.

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

template<typename T>
class LambdaSetter {
public:
    LambdaSetter() :
        getter([&]() -> T { return m_value; }),
        setter([&](T value) { m_value = value; }),
        m_value()
    {}

    T operator()() { return getter(); }
    void operator()(T value) { setter(value); }

    LambdaSetter operator=(T rhs)
    {
        setter(rhs);
        return *this;
    }

    T operator=(LambdaSetter rhs)
    {
        return rhs.getter();
    }

    operator T()
    { 
        return getter();
    }


    void SetGetter(std::function<T()> func) { getter = func; }
    void SetSetter(std::function<void(T)> func) { setter = func; }

    T& GetRawData() { return m_value; }

private:
    T m_value;
    std::function<const T()> getter;
    std::function<void(T)> setter;

    template <typename TT>
    friend std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream &os, const LambdaSetter<TT>& p);

    template <typename TT>
    friend std::istream & operator>>(std::istream &is, const LambdaSetter<TT>& p);
};

template <typename T>
std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream &os, const LambdaSetter<T>& p)
{
    os << p.getter();
    return os;
}

template <typename TT>
std::istream & operator>>(std::istream &is, const LambdaSetter<TT>& p)
{
    TT value;
    is >> value;
    p.setter(value);
    return is;
}


class foo {
public:
    foo()
    {
        myString.SetGetter([&]() -> std::string { 
            myString.GetRawData() = "Hello";
            return myString.GetRawData();
        });
        myString2.SetSetter([&](std::string value) -> void { 
            myString2.GetRawData() = (value + "!"); 
        });
    }


    LambdaSetter<std::string> myString;
    LambdaSetter<std::string> myString2;
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    foo f;
    std::string hi = f.myString;

    f.myString2 = "world";

    std::cout << hi << " " << f.myString2 << std::endl;

    std::cin >> f.myString2;

    std::cout << hi << " " << f.myString2 << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

I tested this in Visual Studio 2013. Unfortunately in order to use the underlying storage inside the LambdaSetter I needed to provide a "GetRawData" public accessor which can lead to broken encapsulation, but you can either leave it out and provide your own storage container for T or just ensure that the only time you use "GetRawData" is when you are writing a custom getter/setter method.

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From the Design Patterns theory; "encapsulate what varies". By defining a 'getter' there is good adherence to the above principle. So, if the implementation-representation of the member changes in future, the member can be 'massaged' before returning from the 'getter'; implying no code refactoring at the client side where the 'getter' call is made.

Regards,

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encapsulate what varies — translating: "write getters and setters". That kind of argumentation doesn't buy me. While the problem of switching internal representation without breaking client code is solved with properties (which can be emulated in C++), getters and setters syntax IMO is really ugly and forces all the clients to write ugly code. So I'd better make the member variable public, especially when it's const. –  ulidtko Mar 19 '12 at 3:22

I have quite similiar design question. It's however the inverse of the top question. I'm writing a C++ library which is still very small. I'm planning to use quite advanced method to manage most of setters and getters in my library:

class Settings
{
    public:
        Settings();
        Settings(const Settings & copy);
        ~Settings();

        /// Setter
        Settings & operator() (argtype::Title, std::string);

        /// <_huge pile_ of other proberties>

        // Getter
        const std::string & operator() (argtype::Title);
    private:
        // <data members>
};

Where argtype is namespace and Title is a instantiation of template IdToken:

namespace argtype { typedef const IdToken<1>    Title; };

The IdToken is a template that just generates unique types for me. Title constant is then defined in library namespace like this:

argtype::Title TITLE = argtype::IdToken<1>();

Example how the setters and getters would work in user code:

Settings object;
// setter chaining:
object(TITLE, "Testing title")  // sets the title and returns refence to *this
(TITLE, "Testing again")        // sets the title again.
(TITLE, "third title");         // sets the title yet again.

// getters
std::string txt = object(TITLE);

And now the question(s): -Is it worth of doing it like this? In future the Settings class might get very big and would have a lot of these setters/getters. -Should I prefer normal functions instead of the fancy operator syntax?

Settings object;
// setter chaining:
object.title("Testing title")    // sets the title and returns refence to *this
.title("Testing again")          // sets the title again.
.title("third title");           // sets the title yet again.

// getters
std::string txt = object.title();

Normal member functions might be easier for me as library writer and harder for the library users. Right?

I already have done some implementation using the operator()() approach just to test it. I'm not buzy with this luckily. :) And just for fun: possible anti-patterns (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-pattern) on this post: Poltergeists, Accidental complexity, Cargo cult programming, Spaghetti code and Silver bullet.

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Your example class violates the rule of three. Although it might be not important for a Settings class, it is a very good practical rule to follow. –  ulidtko Mar 19 '12 at 2:34

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