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I recently decided to give matplotlib.pyplot a try, while having used gnuplot for scientific data plotting for years. I started out with simply reading a data file and plot two columns, like gnuplot would do with plot 'datafile' u 1:2. The requirements for my comfort are:

  • Skip lines beginning with a # and skip empty lines.
  • Allow arbitrary numbers of spaces between and before the actual numbers
  • allow arbitrary numbers of columns
  • be fast

Now, the following code is my solution for the problem. However, compared to gnuplot, it really is not as fast. This is a bit odd, since I read that one big advantage of py(plot/thon) over gnuplot is it's speed.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import sys

datafile = sys.argv[1]
data = []
for line in open(datafile,'r'):
    if line and line[0] != '#':
        cols = filter(lambda x: x!='',line.split(' '))
        for index,col in enumerate(cols):
            if len(data) <= index:
                data.append([])
            data[index].append(float(col))

plt.plot(data[0],data[1])
plt.show()

What would I do to make the data reading faster? I had a quick look at the csv module, but it didn't seem to be very flexible with comments in files and one still needs to iterate over all lines in the file.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since you have matplotlib installed, you must also have numpy installed. numpy.genfromtxt meets all your requirements and should be much faster than parsing the file yourself in a Python loop:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

import textwrap
fname='/tmp/tmp.dat'
with open(fname,'w') as f:
    f.write(textwrap.dedent('''\
        id col1 col2 col3
        2010 1 2 3 4
        # Foo

        2011 5 6 7 8
        # Bar        
        # Baz
        2012 8 7 6 5
        '''))

data = np.genfromtxt(fname, 
                     comments='#',    # skip comment lines
                     dtype = None,    # guess dtype of each column
                     names=True)      # use first line as column names
print(data)
plt.plot(data['id'],data['col2'])
plt.show()
share|improve this answer
    
How does this work without column headers? –  agf Sep 30 '11 at 9:32
    
Remove the names=True parameter to get a plain numpy array, or use names=('col1','col2',...) to supply headers. See the docs linked above for more details. –  unutbu Sep 30 '11 at 9:34
1  
Thank you for the help. A quick tip: When one does not have column names, data[0] would be the first row, not the first column. To fix this, I used: data = np.genfromtxt(...).T which transposes the returned ndarray. However, using this solution still is much slower than gnuplot. (Which reads a 4x10000 numbers file immediately while it takes python about 1/4 s) –  janoliver Sep 30 '11 at 9:51
    
@janoliver: gnuplot is a specialized tool written in C, while pyplot is Python-based. matplotlib/numpy/Python is more versatile than gnuplot, but I would not assume it is faster than gnuplot in the domain of what gnuplot does. –  unutbu Sep 30 '11 at 10:21
    
Of course gnuplot is extremely efficient in doing what it's supposed to do. But I thought that numpy was also optimized pretty well. I also thought that most of the "famous" packages interface with compiled versions of the functions, so that loadtxt or genfromtxt would call some C program themselves to read the file into memory. –  janoliver Sep 30 '11 at 10:30

You really need to profile your code to find out what the bottleneck is.

Here are some micro-optimizations:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import sys

datafile = sys.argv[1]
data = []
# use with to auto-close the file
for line in open(datafile,'r'):
    # line will never be False because it will always have at least a newline
    # maybe you mean line.rstrip()?
    # you can also try line.startswith('#') instead of line[0] != '#'
    if line and line[0] != '#':
        # not sure of the point of this
        # just line.split() will allow any number of spaces
        # if you do need it, use a list comprehension
        # cols = [col for col in line.split(' ') if col]
        # filter on a user-defined function is slow
        cols = filter(lambda x: x!='',line.split(' '))

        for index,col in enumerate(cols):
            # just made data a collections.defaultdict
            # initialized as data = defaultdict(list)
            # and you can skip this 'if' statement entirely
            if len(data) <= index:
                data.append([])
            data[index].append(float(col))

plt.plot(data[0],data[1])
plt.show()

You may be able to do something like:

with open(datafile) as f:
    lines = (line.split() for line in f 
                 if line.rstrip() and not line.startswith('#'))
    data = zip(*[float(col) for col in line for line in lines])

Which will give you a list of tuples instead of an int-keyed dict of lists, but otherwise appears identical. It can be done as a one-liner but I split it up to make it a little easier to read.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you too, for the advice on python in general. –  janoliver Sep 30 '11 at 10:12
    
@janoliver Glad to help. Thanks for your comment on the other answer, I didn't know about that :). –  agf Sep 30 '11 at 10:15

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