Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

What is the best/common solution (best practices) to working with relationships in ORM (from long-life project view)?

1) E.g. I have Oracle HR schema. Is it ok to create relations between every objects (entities) where it is possible or only between objects where I really need now (and change in future)?

@Entity
public class Employee {
    @Id
    private long employeeId;
    @ManyToOne((fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    private Job job;
}

@Entity
public class Job {
    @Id
    private String jobId;
    @OneToMany(fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    private List<Employee> employeeList;
}

2) How should I store/set new Employee with existing or new Job? We have Employee entity with String jobId and also created relation Job job variable:

@Entity
public class Employee {
    @Id
    private long employeeId;
    private String jobId;
    @ManyToOne((fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    private Job job;
}

The worst solutions is set both parameters everytime:

Job job = new Job();
job.setJobId("JOB_01");
Employee employee = new Employee();
employee.setEmployeeId(1L)
employee.setJobId(job.getJobId());

A little bit better solutions is re-implement setJobId() method in Employee class (there should be also some code to find out if mentioned Job exist or not):

public void setJobId(String jobId) {
    if (getJob() == null) {
        this.jobId = jobId;
        job = new Job();
        job.setJobId(jobId);
    } else {
        this.jobId = getJob().getJobId();
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you don't need an association, then you don't need to add it. Note however that even if it's not used in Java code directly, an association might still be useful just to be able to traverse it in JPQL or criteria queries.

Regarding your jobId field, it should just be removed from the Employee entity. An employee has a job, and you can access its job ID using employee.getJob().getId(). You shouldn't be able to set the job ID of an employee. Instead, you should get or create a job (in the service layer), and set the employee's job using setJob(job).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for clear answer. – Ziletka Sep 30 '11 at 10:35
1  
Get the job with the given ID from database (with em.find or em.getReference or session.get or session.load), and set this job in the employee. – JB Nizet Sep 30 '11 at 11:11
1  
You should never create a new Job instance and set its ID yourself to refer to an already existing Job. You should get it from the database. Else, Hibernate thinks the job you're setting in the employee is a new job that must be created along with the employee. – JB Nizet Sep 30 '11 at 11:30
1  
Then you have a problem with your mapping. Ask another question where you show your entities and their mapping annotations, and the code used to persist your employee. – JB Nizet Sep 30 '11 at 11:53
1  
It should work even with the cascade. You have another problem with your mapping. – JB Nizet Sep 30 '11 at 12:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.