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void getFree(void *ptr)
{
    if(ptr != NULL)
    {
        free(ptr);
        ptr = NULL;
    }
    return;
}
int main()
{
char *a;
a=malloc(10);
getFree(a);
if(a==NULL)
    printf("it is null");
else
    printf("not null");
}

Why is the output of this program not NULL?

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2  
The conditional before free is not necessary. It's perfectly OK to call free(0). –  Kerrek SB Sep 30 '11 at 10:04
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5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Because the pointer is copied by value to your function. You are assigning NULL to the local copy of the variable (ptr). This does not assign it to the original copy.

The memory will still be freed, so you can no longer safely access it, but your original pointer will not be NULL.

This the same as if you were passing an int to a function instead. You wouldn't expect the original int to be edited by that function, unless you were passing a pointer to it.

void setInt(int someValue)
{
    someValue = 5;
}

int main()
{
    int someOtherValue = 7;
    setInt(someOtherValue);
    printf("%i\n", someOtherValue); // You'd expect this to print 7, not 5...
    return 0;
}

If you want to null the original pointer, you'll have to pass a pointer-to-pointer:

void getFree(void **ptr)
{
    /* Note we are dereferencing the outer pointer,
    so we're directly editing the original pointer */

    if(*ptr != NULL)
    {
        free(*ptr);
        *ptr = NULL;
    }

    return;
}

int main()
{
    char *a;
    a=malloc(10);

    getFree(&a); /* Pass a pointer-to-pointer */

    if(a==NULL)
        printf("it is null");
    else
        printf("not null");

    return 0;
}
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Because the getFree() function takes a copy of the pointer. ptr and c are both pointers, but they are different variables. It's the same reason why this function will output "6":

void Magic(int x)
{
    x = 1;
}

void main()
{
    int a = 6;
    Magic(a);
    printf("%d", a);
}
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You are passing pointer a by value, so it is not modified by function. It's only a copy of pointer modified within function, the original variable value is not affected.

Update:

If you wanted to make your life easier by replacing freeing + nulling a variable with a single line of code, you need either a macro:

#define MYFREE(x) free(x); x = NULL;

or a function with pointer to pointer argument:

void myfree(void** pp) { free(*pp); *pp = NULL; }
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plz can you explane more –  Mr.32 Sep 30 '11 at 9:56
    
getFree function has no access to original variable, it's only modifying a copy of a on stack. –  Roman R. Sep 30 '11 at 9:58
    
References do not exist in C. –  Corbin Sep 30 '11 at 10:05
    
+1 for understanding why i am doing this..!! i will use now ur macro –  Mr.32 Sep 30 '11 at 10:06
    
@Corbin: Thanks for correction, I suspected this so two other options still apply. –  Roman R. Sep 30 '11 at 10:06
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Pointers are stored as integers somewhere in memory.

When you do a = malloc(10);, a has some value, say 0x1.

When you call getFree(a);, the function copies a into void *ptr.

Now a=0x1 and ptr=0x1.

When you do ptr=NULL, only ptr is changed to NULL, but a is still 0x1..

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You are passing the pointer By value.. (By default C passes the argument by value) which means you are updating the copy only ..not the real location..for that you might need to use pointer to pointer in C

void getFree(void **ptr)
{

    if(*ptr != NULL)
    {
        free(*ptr);
        *ptr = NULL;
    }

    return;
}
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2  
This answer does not fit to the question. Mr.32 is not just calling free. –  undur_gongor Sep 30 '11 at 10:01
    
I think, I miss read it.. sorry..I made the correction please check it :D –  Aman Agarwal Sep 30 '11 at 10:10
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