Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know that the temptation to use generic stored procedures for code reuse can be a trap, but I don't know if this method of parameterizing a query has anything but a constant performance cost.

SELECT
    ...
FROM
    A
LEFT JOIN 
    B ON 
    @IncludeBJoin = 1 AND
    B.AID = A.ID 
WHERE 
    @IncludeBJoin = 0 
    OR B.ID IS NOT NULL -- If included, only include INNER JOIN results

The intent of the above is to short-circuit conditionally unnecessary join to B when only results from A are necessary. This is the simple case, but a practical case would have many such optional joins. I'd like to avoid distinct stored procedures for each combination if it is worth the performance cost.

Then, what about this extension?

SELECT
    ...
FROM
    A
LEFT JOIN 
    B ON 
    @IncludeBJoin = 1 AND
    B.AID = A.ID 
WHERE 
    @IncludeBJoin = 0 
    OR B.ID IS NOT NULL
GROUP BY A... WITH ROLLUP                             -- Extension
HAVING (@AggregatesOnly = 0) OR (GROUPING(A...) = 1)  -- Extension

The intent of the above is to always return the rolled-up aggregates and optionally include the component rows. If @AggregatesOnly = 1, such that I only want the groupings, what performance price would I pay?

Execution plans seems somewhat magical to me as their representations can seem conceptually distant from the original statement definition, and the inner-workings of the SQL execution engine are not well documented publically AFAIK. I've read that procedural logic such as the use of IF statements in stored procedures can really kill the benefit of a compiled stored procedure. Does these short-circuiting mechanisms have the same effect, even though they seem more "set-based"?

share|improve this question
2  
Try SET STATISTICS IO ON then run your query. It will show you if table B was read from. Also you can try adding OPTION (RECOMPILE) to see if that improves matters. See Dynamic Search Conditions in T-SQL –  Martin Smith Sep 30 '11 at 10:49
    
@MartinSmith - Thanks for the link. That is a very informative article. As far as your suggestion to SET STATISTICS IO ON does that constitute a proof? I suspect the answer will vary by the volume of data, previous queries (without RECOMPILE), which indexes are available for the optimizer to choose from, and the distribution of data within the indexed columns. –  uosɐſ Sep 30 '11 at 11:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.