Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this:

A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G  (master branch)

Where F and G are my recent commits and E is the last commit from the origin.

What I need is to make F and G into a separate branch, which other questions cover, but based on commit B, leaving this:

A -- B -- C -- D -- E  (master branch)
      \
       F -- G  (my new branch)

The reason is that commit B is tagged as the stable release (in use on other systems not maintained using git) and I need to make a patch file of commits F and G against that release.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
git checkout B
git branch my_new_branch
git checkout my_new_branch
git cherry-pick F
git cherry-pick G

But this creates only

A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G  (master branch)
      \
       F -- G  (my new branch)

now you need reset master history:

git checkout master
git reset --hard HEAD^^

this will make

A -- B -- C -- D -- E  (master branch)
      \
       F -- G  (my new branch)
share|improve this answer
git checkout B

git branch my_new_branch

git checkout my_new_branch

That creates a new my_new_branch on B. Then you need to:

git cherry-pick F

git cherry-pick G

Note that [A-G] are the commits hash numbers

share|improve this answer
    
Works nicely. Thanks! –  Matt Gibson Sep 30 '11 at 12:13
    
in this case F and G would be left in master branch too –  radistao Sep 30 '11 at 14:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.