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I have some problems reading a file into a hash in Perl.

Chr1_supercontig_000000000  1   500
    PILOT21_588_1_3_14602_59349_1
Chr1_supercontig_000000001  5   100
    PILOT21_588_1_21_7318_90709_1
    PILOT21_588_1_43_18803_144592_1
    PILOT21_588_1_67_13829_193943_1
    PILOT21_588_1_42_19678_132419_1
    PILOT21_588_1_67_4757_125247_1
...

So I have this file above. My desired output is a hash with the "Chr1"-lines as key, and the "PILOT"-lines as values.

Chr1_supercontig_000000000 => PILOT21_588_1_3_14602_59349_1
Chr1_supercontig_000000001 => PILOT21_588_1_21_7318_90709_1, PILOT21_588_1_43_18803_144592_1,...

I am a Perl-rookie, but as far as I know, multiple values can be assigned to a key only by reference, is that correct?

Anyway, I got stuck at this point and need help. Reward for the correct answer is free cookies =)

Best wishes, Philipp

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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are right, the hash values need to be references that point to arrays which contain the PILOT lines.

Here's a way to do it:

my %hash;
open FILE, "filename.txt" or die $!;
my $key;
while (my $line = <FILE>) {
     chomp($line);
     if ($line !~ /^\s/) {
        ($key) = $line =~ /^\S+/g;
        $hash{$key} = [];
     } else {
        $line =~ s/^\s+//;
        push @{ $hash{$key} }, $line;
     }
 }
 close FILE;
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If you need help on how to read the hash, post a comment. –  alexk Sep 30 '11 at 12:48
1  
You probably want to chop off the $key at the first \s to get just 'Chr1_supercontig_000000000' rather than 'Chr1_supercontig_000000000 1 500'. –  mu is too short Sep 30 '11 at 12:50
    
That is correct. –  alexk Sep 30 '11 at 12:55
    
Thanks for the quick response. Haven't tried it yet, but will do right now! The regex you use in the if-clause is looking for lines, that are not starting with a whitespace? –  Philipp Sep 30 '11 at 12:55
1  
if ($line =~ /^(\S+)/) { $key = $1; ... saves you a line of code. And you do not need to pre-define $hash{$key}. –  TLP Sep 30 '11 at 13:35
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You can read the file line-by-line keeping track of the current hash key:

open my $fh, '<', 'file' or die $!;

my (%hash, $current_key);

while (<$fh>) {
    chomp;        
    $current_key = $1, next if /^(\S+)/;
    s/^\s+//; # remove leading space
    push @{ $hash{$current_key} }, $_;
}
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1  
Thanks, I have tried this as well, works fine! crisp and clear =) –  Philipp Sep 30 '11 at 13:20
1  
push @{$hash{$current_key}}, split would save you both chomp and s/s+//. –  TLP Sep 30 '11 at 14:17
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How about:

#!/usr/bin/perl 
use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dump qw(dump);

my %hash;
my $key;
while(<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    if (/^(Chr1_supercontig_\d+)/) {
        $key = $1;
        $hash{$key} = ();
    } else {
        push @{$hash{$key}}, $_;
    }
}
dump%hash;

__DATA__
Chr1_supercontig_000000000  1   500
    PILOT21_588_1_3_14602_59349_1
Chr1_supercontig_000000001  5   100
    PILOT21_588_1_21_7318_90709_1
    PILOT21_588_1_43_18803_144592_1
    PILOT21_588_1_67_13829_193943_1
    PILOT21_588_1_42_19678_132419_1
    PILOT21_588_1_67_4757_125247_1

output:

(
  "Chr1_supercontig_000000001",
  [
    "    PILOT21_588_1_21_7318_90709_1",
    "    PILOT21_588_1_43_18803_144592_1",
    "    PILOT21_588_1_67_13829_193943_1",
    "    PILOT21_588_1_42_19678_132419_1",
    "    PILOT21_588_1_67_4757_125247_1",
  ],
  "Chr1_supercontig_000000000",
  ["    PILOT21_588_1_3_14602_59349_1"],
)
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Many good answers already, so I'll add one that does not rely on regexes, but rather on that the key-lines contain three space/tab delimited entries, and the values only one.

It will automatically strip leading whitespace and newlines, and so is somewhat convenient.

use strict;
use warnings;

my %hash;
my $key;

while (<DATA>) {
    my @row = split;
    if (@row > 1) {
        $key = shift @row;
    } else {
        push @{$hash{$key}}, shift @row;
    }
}

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper \%hash;

__DATA__
Chr1_supercontig_000000000  1   500
    PILOT21_588_1_3_14602_59349_1
Chr1_supercontig_000000001  5   100
    PILOT21_588_1_21_7318_90709_1
    PILOT21_588_1_43_18803_144592_1
    PILOT21_588_1_67_13829_193943_1
    PILOT21_588_1_42_19678_132419_1
    PILOT21_588_1_67_4757_125247_1
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Try this ,

#!/usr/bin/perl 
use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my ( $fh,$cur );
my $hash = ();
open $fh,'<' , 'file' or die "Can not open file\n";

while (<$fh> ) {
    chomp;
    if ( /^(Chr.+? ).+/ ) {
        $cur = $1;
        $hash->{$cur} = '';
    }
    else {
        $hash->{$cur} = $hash->{$cur} .$_ . ',';
    }
}

print Dumper $hash;

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Here is another fairly short, clear version:

while (<>) {
   if(/^Chr\S+/) {
      $c=$&;
   } else {
      /\S+/;
      push @{ $p{$c} }, $&;
   }
}

And to print the results:

foreach my $pc ( sort keys %p ) {
   print "$pc => ".join(", ", @{$p{$pc}})."\n";
}

This is a shorter print-results (but the first one seems more readable to me):

map { print "$_ => ".join(", ", @{$p{$_}})."\n" } sort keys %p;

One-liner from command line:

perl <1 -e 'while(<>){ if(/^Chr\S+/){ $c=$&; }else{ /\S+/; push(@{$p{$c}},$&);} } map { print "$_ => ".join(", ", @{$p{$_}})."\n" } sort keys %p;'
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