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What is the difference between two arrays definitions? Are they realized different in memory?

 int var = 5;
 int (*p4)[2] = new int [var][2]; // first 2d array

 int** p5 = new int*[var];  // second 2d array
 for(int i = 0; i < var; ++i){
     p5[i] = new int[2];
 }   
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, they're very different. The first is really a single array; the second is actually var+1 arrays, potentially scattered all over your RAM. var arrays hold the data, and one holds pointers to the var data arrays.

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3  
And don't use either one. Use std::vector. –  Mark B Sep 30 '11 at 14:02
1  
Better yet, Boost.MultiArray. –  larsmans Sep 30 '11 at 14:04
    
so, for the second case, how is for example cell p5[2][1] found? for the first case I guess it is something like *(p4 + 2*var + 1). –  scdmb Sep 30 '11 at 14:08
1  
In the second case, p5[2] is a pointer to an array, which is followed, then the resulting array is indexed with 1. –  larsmans Sep 30 '11 at 14:09
    
so, for the second case, how is for example cell p5[2][1] found? for the first case I guess it is something like *(p4 + 2*var + 1) // that should be *((int * )p4 + 2*i + j), otherwise arithmetic for p4 will be wrong done –  scdmb Sep 30 '11 at 14:35

The first is an ordinary, fully contiguous array, the second is also known as jagged array or lliffe vector and can e.g. be used to represent triangular structures.

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