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A friend of mine needed help counting the occurrences of a substring in a string, and I came up with the following code. Does anyone know a better method to do this?

#include "stdio.h"
#include "string.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char str1[50], str2[50];
    int i, j, l1, l2, match, count;

    printf("String 1:\n");
    gets(str2);
    printf("String 2:\n");
    gets(str1);

    l1 = strlen(str1);
    l2 = strlen(str2);

    count = 0;

    for(i = 0; i < l1; i++)
    {
        match = 0;
        for(j = 0; j < l2; j++)
        {
            if(str1[i + j] == str2[j])
            {
                match++;
            }
        }

        if(match == l2)
        {
            count++;
        }
    }

    printf("Substrings: %d\n", count);
}
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Why don't you make your homework yourself? –  GreenScape Sep 30 '11 at 14:27
    
LOL it's not my homework, and you can see I've already done it... I was just looking for a better solution. –  guhemama Sep 30 '11 at 14:36
    
Use #include <stdio.h> with angle brackets instead of quotes; it's what the standard says you should do. Although the quotes work, they're aconventional. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 30 '11 at 14:46
    
Thanks for the info, but I only changed them here because StackOverflow wasn't showing them in its WYSIWYG editor. :) –  guhemama Sep 30 '11 at 14:55
    
How many times does "aba" exist in "abababa"? –  pmg Sep 30 '11 at 15:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Please do not use or encourage the use of gets. Beyond the fact that it will introduce a point of failure in your code, it has been deprecated as of C99 and will be gone completely from C1X.

As others have said, strstr is your friend here:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void)
{
  char s1[50], s2[50];
  char *p;
  size_t count = 0;
  size_t len1;

  printf("Gimme a string: ");
  fflush(stdout);
  fgets(s1, sizeof s1, stdin);
  p = strchr(s1, '\n');          // get rid of the trailing newline
  if (p)
    *p = 0;

  printf("Gimme another string: ");
  fflush(stdout);
  fgets(s2, sizeof s2, stdin);
  p = strchr(s2, '\n');          // get rid of the trailing newline
  if (p)
    *p = 0;

  p = s2;
  len1 = strlen(s1);

  while ((p = strstr(p, s1)) != NULL && p != s1)
  {
    count++;
    p += len1;
  }

  printf("Found %lu occurrences of %s in %s\n", count, s1, s2);
  return 0;
}
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1  
Good point about not using gets(). Although it will not be standard in C1X, it will (sadly) be present in C libraries for another decade or three for reasons of backwards incompatibility. Personally, I think the correct implementation is char *gets(char *buffer) { abort(); return 0; } (where the return is optional if the compiler knows that abort() does not return). –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 30 '11 at 15:01
    
Thanks for the info mate. GCC always complains about gets(), so I guess I'll try to get acquainted to fgets() hehe. Just a simple question: are all those fflush's really needed? –  guhemama Sep 30 '11 at 15:10
    
Standard output is (normally) buffered, so if you write a string without a terminating newline, it may not show up on the console without an explicit flush. –  John Bode Sep 30 '11 at 15:31

how about this: (using the strstr function, reference here)

int count = 0;
char str1[50], str2[50];
char* tmp = str1;
int count;

printf("String 1:\n");
gets(str2);
printf("String 2:\n");
gets(str1);

while(*tmp != '\0' && (tmp = strstr(tmp, str2))) {
    ++count;
    ++tmp;
}
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It worked flawlessly. I already knew strstr, but I did not realize how to use its return value. Simple and efficient solution, thanks! –  guhemama Sep 30 '11 at 14:51
    
I think you're missing a parenthesis in that while definition that encloses tmp = strstr(tmp, str2). This answer helped me a lot, thank you. –  Hernán Erasmo Jul 25 at 22:03
    
@HernánErasmo: Fixed it. Thanks. –  Constantinius Jul 26 at 14:10

You might want to take a look at the strstr function (if you're not already familiar with it).

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I don't think that this function is defined in the C standard. I guess it is only available in non-standard extensions. –  Constantinius Sep 30 '11 at 14:30
    
You're right. Changed my post from "instr" to "strstr". Thanks. –  0xCAFEBABE Sep 30 '11 at 14:32
int main()
  {
          char *str = "This is demo";
          char *sub = "is";
          int i,j,count;
          i=j=count=0;
          while(str[i]!='\0')
          {
           if (str[i] == sub[j] && str[i+1] == sub[j+1])
          {
                  count++;
          }
          i++;
          }
          cout<<count;
          return 0;
  }

Above code works but this is static.

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