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I have had recently two telephone interviews where I've been asked about the differences between an Interface and an Abstract class. I have explained every aspect of them I could think of, but it seems they are waiting for me to mention something specific, and I don't know what it is.

From my experience I think the following is true. If I am missing a major point please let me know.

Interface:

Every single Method declared in an Interface will have to be implemented in the subclass. Only Events, Delegates, Properties (C#) and Methods can exist in a Interface. A class can implement multiple Interfaces.

Abstract Class:

Only Abstract methods have to be implemented by the subclass. An Abstract class can have normal methods with implementations. Abstract class can also have class variables beside Events, Delegates, Properties and Methods. A class can only implement one abstract class only due non-existence of Multi-inheritance in C#.

  1. After all that, the interviewer came up with the question "What if you had an Abstract class with only abstract methods? How would that be different from an interface?" I didn't know the answer but I think it's the inheritance as mentioned above right?

  2. An another interviewer asked me what if you had a Public variable inside the interface, how would that be different than in Abstract Class? I insisted you can't have a public variable inside an interface. I didn't know what he wanted to hear but he wasn't satisfied either.

See Also:

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132  
While I think it's important to know the difference between the two, this isn't a good interview question, imo. Unless the job was writing a book on OO topics. You're better off not working for those ding bats. –  Alan Apr 17 '09 at 16:50
40  
@Alan: I actually like this as an interview question, but I wouldn't hound somebody this way about it - I'd probably post it more like "Where would you choose an interface over an abstract base class, when defining a hierarchy?", or something similar. –  Reed Copsey Apr 17 '09 at 17:00
7  
Maybe they were after a more design focused answer... though like you I would have treated it as a technical question. –  CurtainDog Jan 19 '10 at 6:32
7  
Nice tabular differences here: mindprod.com/jgloss/interfacevsabstract.html –  Rajat_R Feb 1 '13 at 3:38
4  
@Kave: I insisted you can't have a public variable inside an interface. I think interface can have public variable. In fact variables in interface are automatically public and final. –  a Learner Jul 5 '13 at 11:30

25 Answers 25

up vote 203 down vote accepted

While your question indicates it's for "general OO", it really seems to be focusing on .NET use of these terms.

In .NET (similar for Java):

  • interfaces can have no state or implementation
  • a class that implements an interface must provide an implementation of all the methods of that interface
  • abstract classes may contain state (data members) and/or implementation (methods)
  • abstract classes can be inherited without implementing the abstract methods (though such a derived class is abstract itself)
  • interfaces may be multiple-inherited, abstract classes may not (this is probably the key concrete reason for interfaces to exist separately from abtract classes - they permit an implementation of multiple inheritance that removes many of the problems of general MI).

As general OO terms, the differences are not necessarily well-defined. For example, there are C++ programmers who may hold similar rigid definitions (interfaces are a strict subset of abstract classes that cannot contain implementation), while some may say that an abstract class with some default implementations is still an interface or that a non-abstract class can still define an interface.

Indeed, there is a C++ idiom called the Non-Virtual Interface (NVI) where the public methods are non-virtual methods that 'thunk' to private virtual methods:

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2  
Thank you. I think since your answer mentions state + a good overview of all rest, i mark your response as a final answer. You are right I asked for general OO, since my first interviewer asked for general OO, but since I am a C# guy, I tend to forget that. ;-) Also thanks for the C++ explanation, as always c++ is mind blowing. –  Hooman Apr 17 '09 at 17:34
2  
I think a key point in the explanation Michael provided is that when implementing an interface you MUST implement all members in the interface, but when inheriting from an abstract class it's NOT REQUIRED by a child class to implement its parent's members –  Guillermo Gomez Mar 2 '10 at 21:12
19  
+1: I'd be willing to bet that those monkeys hosting the interview don't even realise that other languages implement OO differently. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 11 '12 at 10:49
    
@MichaelBurr Michael, in this MSDN article they state that "Abstract methods have no implementation" which conflicts with one of your bullet points. Are there exceptions to their rule or has the rule changed? –  J L Aug 30 '13 at 18:10
    
@JL I don't see where the problem lies. You seem to have confused abstract method with abstract class. Abstract methods have no implementation. However, inside of an abstract class, some methods can be abstract(i.e. without implementation) while some others can indeed have implementation. –  AnonJ Apr 30 at 4:05

How about an analogy: when I was in the Air Force, I went to pilot training and became a USAF pilot. At that point I wasn't qualified to fly anything, and had to attend aircraft type training. Once I qualified, I was a pilot (Abstract class) and a C-141 pilot (concrete class). At one of my assignments, I was given an additional duty: Safety Officer. Now I was still a pilot and a C-141 pilot, but I also performed Safety Officer duties (I implemented ISafetyOfficer, so to speak). A pilot wasn't required to be a safety officer, other people could have done it as well.

All USAF pilots have to follow certain Air Force-wide regulations, and all C-141 (or F-16, or T-38) pilots 'are' USAF pilots. Anyone can be a safety officer. So, to summarize:

  • Pilot: abstract class
  • C-141 Pilot: concrete class
  • ISafety Officer: interface

added note: this was meant to be an analogy to help explain the concept, not a coding recommendation. See the various comments below, the discussion is interesting.

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35  
I really like this analogy, it uses a simple example to explain a slightly complex topic –  Kevin Bowersox Jan 7 '12 at 16:37
6  
This is the best way to understand complex OO terminology. In short all theory is worth only when you can make use of it practically. @Jay you rexample is really easy to grasp then several bullet points (mostly penetrating mind instead of being absorbed!) –  v s Sep 20 '12 at 8:56
18  
I'm still a bit confused. Say, you now got the F-16 and T-38 qualifications, so now class Jay cannot inherit from multiple classes (C-141 pilot, F-16 pilot and T-38 pilot), does that mean that whose classes should become interfaces? Thanks –  Alex Okrushko Jan 30 '13 at 15:31
10  
Lots of folks have rightly given a +1 to Alex's comment, as it reveals some weakness in this example. First, I would say that Jay would be an instance of C-141Pilot rather than its own class. Additionally, since in the USAF 99% of all pilots are only qualified in one aircraft at a time (FCF and test pilots being notable exceptions) I didn't consider multiple qualifications and how that might be implemented. As I know of a pilot who, 50 years ago, was qualified in 25 different aircraft simultaneously, I think that exemplifies how we do NOT want to use multiple inheritance. –  Jay Jul 16 '13 at 5:51
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I think it is important to note that in practice you would most likely not mix a plane model with a pilot in a single inheritance tree - you would have an abstract Pilot class and an abstract Plane class and then possibly mix them together at runtime (Pilot.fly(<Plane>PlaneModel)). However, you might want a Plane to implement SafetyInterface that declares methods like ejectPilot, parkingBrakes etc. This way, each plane can have its own way of ejecting the pilot while ensuring that the method will be the same for all planes as long as the interface is implemented. –  Robert Rossmann Dec 3 '13 at 21:52

I think the answer they are looking for is the fundamental or OPPS philosophical difference.

The abstract class inheritance is used when the derived class shares the core properties and behaviour of the abstract class. The kind of behaviour that actually defines the class.

On the other hand interface inheritance is used when the classes share peripheral behaviour, ones which do not necessarily define the derived class.

For eg. A Car and a Truck share a lot of core properties and behaviour of an Automobile abstract class, but they also share some peripheral behaviour like Generate exhaust which even non automobile classes like Drillers or PowerGenerators share and doesn't necessarily defines a Car or a Truck, so Car, Truck, Driller and PowerGenerator can all share the same interface IExhaust.

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12  
I think an even better analogy would be "usesFuel" which would show the contract nature of the interface. –  Pureferret Sep 4 '12 at 12:15
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I like this explanation a lot. Thanks Prasun. –  Pavan Dec 7 '12 at 20:48
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Think of "what it is," versus "what it does." If and only if, you have four wheels, a body with doors, and an engine, then you're a car, and must derive from the abstract class which defines what a car is. But all sorts of completely dissimilar things may implement a fuel nozzle - cars, planes, simple fuel containers (gas cans). With an abstract class, you can define code and default implementations; with an interface, you cannot implement; you can only define the interface. –  Edward Ned Harvey Mar 25 '13 at 16:05
    
@EdwardNedHarvey "what it is" vs "what can be done with it" maybe? IDrivable, IOccupiable, ISteerable interfaces? What about the case of three wheeled cars or two and one-wheeled concept cars (similar in concept to segway balance mechanism)? Also, though I'm sure you'd list several other qualifiers upon due consideration, n.b. that generators with maintenance doors and four wheels (fairly common) would satisfy your stated definition of a car. –  Code Jockey Apr 8 at 14:05

Short: Abstract classes are used for Modelling a class hierarchy of similar looking classes (For example Animal can be abstract class and Human , Lion, Tiger can be concrete derived classes)

AND

Interface is used for Communication between 2 similar / non similar classes which does not care about type of the class implementing Interface(e.g. Height can be interface property and it can be implemented by Human , Building , Tree. It does not matter if you can eat , you can swim you can die or anything.. it matters only a thing that you need to have Height (implementation in you class) ).

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There are a couple of other differences -

Interfaces can't have any concrete implementations. Abstract base classes can. This allows you to provide concrete implementations there. This can allow an abstract base class to actually provide a more rigorous contract, wheras an interface really only describes how a class is used. (The abstract base class can have non-virtual members defining the behavior, which gives more control to the base class author.)

More than one interface can be implemented on a class. A class can only derive from a single abstract base class. This allows for polymorphic hierarchy using interfaces, but not abstract base classes. This also allows for a pseudo-multi-inheritance using interfaces.

Abstract base classes can be modified in v2+ without breaking the API. Changes to interfaces are breaking changes.

[C#/.NET Specific] Interfaces, unlike abstract base classes, can be applied to value types (structs). Structs cannot inherit from abstract base classes. This allows behavioral contracts/usage guidelines to be applied on value types.

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+1 for the key point that more than one interface can be implemented on a class. –  altCognito Apr 17 '09 at 16:50
    
That's the one real advantage to interfaces over abstract base classes, IMO. Otherwise, I agree with the .NET design guidelines, that now say to "prefer abstract base classes over interfaces" –  Reed Copsey Apr 17 '09 at 16:51
    
Although, it would be keen if you could add the point that it's also interfaces can be applied to any class. –  altCognito Apr 17 '09 at 16:52
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@altCognito: Figured that was kind of handled with the second paragraph. This did remind me, though, that interfaces work on value types, so I added that. –  Reed Copsey Apr 17 '09 at 16:59
    
Thank you very much for this exact description. It is indeed very helpful. I am new here. It is a pity you cant select two responses as "answer". One thing that confuses me is your usage of Abstract 'base' class. All abstract classes are meant to be a base class of a subclass. Why naming the 'base' extra? –  Hooman Apr 17 '09 at 17:20

The interviewers are barking up an odd tree. For languages like C# and Java, there is a difference, but in other languages like C++ there is not. OO theory doesn't differentiate the two, merely the syntax of language.

An abstract class is a class with both implementation and interface (pure virtual methods) that will be inherited. Interfaces generally do not have any implementation but only pure virtual functions.

In C# or Java an abstract class without any implementation differs from an interface only in the syntax used to inherit from it and the fact you can only inherit from one.

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Inheritance
Consider a car and a bus. They are two different vehicles. But still they share some common properties like they have a steering, brakes, gears, engine etc.
So with the inheritance concept this can be represented as following..

public class Vehicle {
    public Driver driver;
    public Seat[] seatArray; //In java and most of the Object Oriented Programming(OOP) languages, square brackets are used to denote arrays(Collections).
    //You can define as many properties as you want here..
}

Now a Bicycle..

public class Bicycle extends Vehicle {
    //You define properties which are unique to bicycles here..
    public Pedal pedal;
}

And a Car..

public class Car extends Vehicle {
    public Engine engine;
    public Door[] doors;
}

That's all about Inheritance. We use them to classify objects into simpler Base forms and their children as we saw above.

Abstract Classes

Abstract classes are incomplete objects. To understand it further, let's consider the vehicle analogy once again.
A vehicle can be driven. Right? But different vehicles are driven in different ways.. For example, You cannot drive a car just as you drive a Bicycle.
So how to represent the drive function of a vehicle? It is harder to check what type of vehicle it is and drive it with its own function; you would have to change the Driver class again and again when adding a new type of vehicle.
Here comes the role of abstract classes and methods. You can define the drive method as abstract to tell that every inheriting children must implement this function.
So if you modify the vehicle class..

//......Code of Vehicle Class
abstract public void Drive();
//.....Code continues

The Bicycle and Car must also specify how to drive it. Otherwise the code won't compile and an error is thrown.
In short.. an abstract class is a partially incomplete class with some incomplete functions, which the inheriting children must specify their own.

Interfaces Interfaces are totally incomplete. They do not have any properties. They just indicate that the inheriting children is capable of doing something..
Suppose you have different types of mobile phones with you. Each of them have different ways to do different functions; Ex: call a person. The maker of the phone specifies how to do it. Here the mobile phones can dial a number - that is, it is dial-able. Let's represent this as an interface.

public interface Dialable {
    public void Dial(Number n);
}

Here the maker of the Dialable defines how to dial a number. You just need to give it a number to dial.

Dialable myPhone1 = new Dialable() {
    public void Dial(Number n) {
        //Do the phone1's own way to dial a number
    }
}

Dialable myPhone2 = new Dialable() {
    public void Dial(Number n) {
        //Do the phone2's own way to dial a number
    }
}

Here by using interfaces instead of abstract classes, you need not worry about it's properties. Ex: Does it have a touch-screen or dial pad, Is it a fixed landline phone or mobile phone. You just need to know if it is dialable; does it inherit(or implement) the Dialable interface.
Interfaces are commonly used by developers to ensure interoperability(use interchangeably) between objects, as far as they share a common function (just like you may change to a landline or mobile phone, as far as you just need to dial a number). In short, interfaces are much simpler version of abstract classes, without any properties.
Also note that that you may implement(inherit) as many interfaces as you want but you may only extend(inherit) a single parent class.

More Info Abstract classes vs Interfaces

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answered by him/herself... –  Nitram76 Jun 14 '13 at 13:14
    
Sorry, Could you please explain what do you mean @Nitram76? –  Farzeen Jun 18 '13 at 16:00

By implementing interfaces you are achieving composition ("has-a" relationships) instead of inheritance ("is-a" relationships). That is an important principle to remember when it comes to things like design patterns where you need to use interfaces to achieve a composition of behaviors instead of an inheritance.

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Interfaces achieve, IMO, more of an "Acts-as-a" relationship. Encapsulation achieves composition better than an interface. –  Reed Copsey Apr 17 '09 at 17:01
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I dont think implementing interfaces would come under composition. –  Pavan Dec 7 '12 at 20:49

For .Net,

Your answer to The second interviewer is also the answer to the first one... Abstract classes can have implementation, AND state, interfaces cannot...

EDIT: On another note, I wouldn't even use the phrase 'subclass' (or the 'inheritance' phrase) to describe classes that are 'defined to implement' an interface. To me, an interface is a definition of a contract that a class must conform to if it has been defined to 'implement' that interface. It does not inherit anything... You have to add everything yourself, explicitly.

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Yes! State! Thats what the second interviewer meant with his weird way of saying "public variable" inside an interface. gosh! Abstract Classes can have state, interfaces can't! And yeah the everyone else agrees on the differences between their ways of inheritance as well, which I had forgotten to mention but figured out already later. :) Thanks everyone! –  Hooman Apr 17 '09 at 17:11
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More than just state.... Abstract classes can have IMPLEMENTATION. i.e., they can have methods with code in them that actually runs and does something, which gets inhertited and executed by instances of the base classes... Not so with interfaces –  Charles Bretana Mar 10 '11 at 15:51

Conceptually speaking, keeping the language specific implementation, rules, benefits and achieving any programming goal by using anyone or both, can or cant have code/data/property, blah blah, single or multiple inheritance, all aside

1- Abstract (or pure abstract) Class is a mean to implement hierarchy. If your business objects look somewhat structurally similar, representing a parent child (hierarchy) kind of relationship only then inheritance/Abstract classes will be used. If your business model does not have a hierarchy then inheritance should not be used (here i am not talking about programming logic e.g. some design patterns require inheritance). Conceptually, abstract class is a method to implement hierarchy of a business model in OOP, it has nothing to do with Interfaces, actually comparing Abstract class with Interface is meaningless because both are conceptually totally different things, it is asked in interviews just to check the concepts because it looks both provide somewhat same functionality when implementation is concerned and we programmers usually emphasize more on coding. [Keep this in mind as well that Abstraction is different than Abstract Class].

2- Interface is a contract, a complete business functionality represented by one of more set of functions. That is why it is implemented and not inherited. A business object (part of a hierarchy or not) can have any number of complete business functionality. It has nothing to do with abstract classes means inheritance in general. For example, a human can RUN, an elephant can RUN, a bird can RUN, and so on, all these objects of different hierarchy would implement the RUN interface or EAT or SPEAK interface. Dont go into implementation as you might implement it as having abstract classes for each type implementing these interfaces. An object of any hierarchy can have a functionality(interface) which has nothing to do with its hierarchy.

I believe, Interfaces were not invented to achieve multiple inheritance or to expose public behavior, and similarly, pure abstract classes are not to over rule interfaces but Interface is a functionality that an object can do (via functions of that interface) and Abstract Class represents a parent of a hierarchy to produce children having core structure (property+functionality) of the parent

When you are asked about the difference, it is actually conceptual difference not the difference in language specific implementation unless asked explicitly.

I believe, both interviewers were expecting one line straight forward difference between these two and when you failed they tried to drove you towards this difference by implementing ONE as the OTHER

What if you had an Abstract class with only abstract methods?

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Interfaces are light weight way to enforce a particular behavior. That is one way to think of.

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After all that, the interviewer came up with the question "What if you had an 
Abstract class with only abstract methods? How would that be different
from an interface?" 

Docs clearly say that if an abstract class contains only abstract method declarations, it should be declared as an interface instead.

An another interviewer asked me what if you had a Public variable inside
the interface, how would that be different than in Abstract Class?

Variables in Interfaces are by default public static and final. Question could be framed like what if all variables in abstract class are public? Well they can still be non static and non final unlike the variables in interfaces.

Finally I would add one more point to those mentioned above - abstract classes are still classes and fall in a single inheritance tree whereas interfaces can be present in multiple inheritance.

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An interface defines a contract for a service or set of services. They provide polymorphism in a horizontal manner in that two completely unrelated classes can implement the same interface but be used interchangeably as a parameter of the type of interface they implement, as both classes have promised to satisfy the set of services defined by the interface. Interfaces provide no implementation details.

An abstract class defines a base structure for its sublcasses, and optionally partial implementation. Abstract classes provide polymorphism in a vertical, but directional manner, in that any class that inherits the abstract class can be treated as an instance of that abstract class but not the other way around. Abstract classes can and often do contain implementation details, but cannot be instantiated on their own- only their subclasses can be "newed up".

C# does allow for interface inheritance as well, mind you.

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1) An interface can be seen as a pure Abstract Class, is the same, but despite this, is not the same to implement an interface and inheriting from an abstract class. When you inherit from this pure abstract class you are defining a hierarchy -> inheritance, if you implement the interface you are not, and you can implement as many interfaces as you want, but you can only inherit from one class.

2) You can define a property in an interface, so the class that implements that interface must have that property.

For example:

  public interface IVariable
  {
      string name {get; set;}
  }

The class that implements that interface must have a property like that.

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Though this question is quite old, I would like to add one other point in favor of interfaces:

Interfaces can be injected using any Dependency Injection tools where as Abstract class injection supported by very few.

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1  
I believe you mean that a DI tool can inject a class which implements an interface. Some such tools can also inject classes derived from an abstract class, or are you saying that is impossible? –  John Saunders Aug 31 '12 at 14:30
    
corrected my answer! –  alliswell Sep 1 '12 at 2:05
  1. Interface:
    • We do not implement (or define) methods, we do that in derived classes.
    • We do not declare member variables in interfaces.
    • Interfaces express the HAS-A relationship. That means they are a mask of objects.
  2. Abstract class:
    • We can declare and define methods in abstract class.
    • We hide constructors of it. That means there is no object created from it directly.
    • Abstract class can hold member variables.
    • Derived classes inherit to abstract class that mean objects from derived classes are not masked, it inherit to abstract class. The relationship in this case is IS-A.

This is my opinion.

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Copied from CLR via C# by Jeffrey Richter...

I often hear the question, “Should I design a base type or an interface?” The answer isn’t always clearcut.

Here are some guidelines that might help you:

■■ IS-A vs. CAN-DO relationship A type can inherit only one implementation. If the derived type can’t claim an IS-A relationship with the base type, don’t use a base type; use an interface. Interfaces imply a CAN-DO relationship. If the CAN-DO functionality appears to belong with various object types, use an interface. For example, a type can convert instances of itself to another type (IConvertible), a type can serialize an instance of itself (ISerializable), etc. Note that value types must be derived from System.ValueType, and therefore, they cannot be derived from an arbitrary base class. In this case, you must use a CAN-DO relationship and define an interface.

■■ Ease of use It’s generally easier for you as a developer to define a new type derived from a base type than to implement all of the methods of an interface. The base type can provide a lot of functionality, so the derived type probably needs only relatively small modifications to its behavior. If you supply an interface, the new type must implement all of the members.

■■ Consistent implementation No matter how well an interface contract is documented, it’s very unlikely that everyone will implement the contract 100 percent correctly. In fact, COM suffers from this very problem, which is why some COM objects work correctly only with Microsoft Word or with Windows Internet Explorer. By providing a base type with a good default implementation, you start off using a type that works and is well tested; you can then modify parts that need modification.

■■ Versioning If you add a method to the base type, the derived type inherits the new method, you start off using a type that works, and the user’s source code doesn’t even have to be recompiled. Adding a new member to an interface forces the inheritor of the interface to change its source code and recompile.

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+1 for is-a and can-do. –  Abdullah Shoaib May 8 at 17:01

From another answer of mine, mostly dealing with when to use one versus the other:

In my experience, interfaces are best used when you have several classes which each need to respond to the same method or methods so that they can be used interchangeably by other code which will be written against those classes' common interface. The best use of an interface is when the protocol is important but the underlying logic may be different for each class. If you would otherwise be duplicating logic, consider abstract classes or standard class inheritance instead.

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Couple of other differences:

Abstract classes can have static methods, properties, fields etc. and operators, interfaces can't. Cast operator allows casting to/from abstract class but don't allow casting to/from interface.

So pretty much you can use abstract class on its own even if it is never implemented (through its static members) and you can't use interface on its own in any way.

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in Java, interface can have member variable but by default they become public static ..so interface can have static fields –  Jitendra Vispute Jun 10 '13 at 11:12
    
Yes interface can have static fields. BUT interface cannot have static methods. –  a Learner Jul 5 '13 at 11:42

Difference between Java Interface and Abstract Class

  1. Main difference is methods of a Java interface are implicitly abstract and cannot have implementations. A Java abstract class can have instance methods that implements a default behavior.

  2. Variables declared in a Java interface is by default final. An abstract class may contain non-final variables.

  3. Members of a Java interface are public by default. A Java abstract class can have the usual flavors of class members like private, protected, etc..

  4. Java interface should be implemented using keyword “implements”; A Java abstract class should be extended using keyword “extends”.

  5. An interface can extend another Java interface only, an abstract class can extend another Java class and implement multiple Java interfaces.

  6. A Java class can implement multiple interfaces but it can extend only one abstract class.

  7. Interface is absolutely abstract and cannot be instantiated; A Java abstract class also cannot be instantiated, but can be invoked if a main() exists.

  8. In comparison with java abstract classes, java interfaces are slow as it requires extra indirection.

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Most answers focus on the technical difference between Abstract Class and Interface, but since technically, an interface is basically a kind of abstract class (one without any data or implementation), I think the conceptual difference is far more interesting, and that might be what the interviewers are after.

An Interface is an agreement. It specifies: "this is how we're going to talk to each other". It can't have any implementation because it's not supposed to have any implementation. It's a contract. It's like the .h header files in C.

An Abstract Class is an incomplete implementation. A class may or may not implement an interface, and an abstract class doesn't have to implement it completely. An abstract class without any implementation is kind of useless, but totally legal.

Basically any class, abstract or not, is about what it is, whereas an interface is about how you use it. For example: Animal might be an abstract class implementing some basic metabolic functions, and specifying abstract methods for breathing and locomotion without giving an implementation, because it has no idea whether it should breathe through gills or lungs, and whether it flies, swims, walks or crawls. Mount, on the other hand, might be an Interface, which specifies that you can ride the animal, without knowing what kind of animal it is (or whether it's an animal at all!).

The fact that behind the scenes, an interface is basically an abstract class with only abstract methods, doesn't matter. Conceptually, they fill totally different roles.

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i read you ans it nice one, you can read my ans also if yo don't mind. –  JegsVala May 31 at 6:41

i will explain Depth Details of interface and Abstract class.if you know overview about interface and abstract class, then first question arrive in your mind when we should use Interface and when we should use Abstract class. So please check below explanation of Interface and Abstract class.

  1. When we should use Interface?

    if you don't know about implementation just we have requirement specification then we go with Interface

  2. When we should use Abstract Class?

    if you know implementation but not completely (partially implementation) then we go with Abstract class.

    Interface

    every method by default public abstract means interface is 100% pure abstract.

    Abstract

    can have Concrete method and Abstract method, what is Concrete method, which have implementation in Abstract class, Abstract class must have at lease one abstract method.

    Interface

    We cannot declared interface as a private, protected

    Q. Why we are not declaring Interface a private and protected?

    Because by default interface method is public abstract so and so that reason that we are not declaring the interface as private and protected.

    Interface method
    also we cannot declared interface as private,protected,final,static,synchronized,native.....

    i will give the reason: why we are not declaring synchronized method because we cannot create object of interface and synchronize are work on object so and son reason that we are not declaring the synchronized method Transient concept are also not applicable because transient work with synchronized.

    Abstract

    we are happily use with public,private final static.... means no restriction are applicable in abstract.

    Interface

    Variables are declared in Interface as a by default public static final so we are also not declared variable as a private, protected.

    Volatile modifier is also not applicable in interface because interface variable is by default public static final and final variable you cannot change the value once it assign the value into variable and once you declared variable into interface you must to assign the variable.

    And volatile variable is keep on changes so it is opp. to final that is reason we are not use volatile variable in interface.

    Abstract

    Abstract variable no need to declared public static final.

i hope this article is useful.

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Great explanation... +1 from my side... –  Krishnraj Rana May 31 at 8:53

The answer to the second question may be that the public variable defined in interface is static final by default while the public variable in abstract class is an instance variable .

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Interface:- == contract.Whichever class implements it has to follow all the specification of interface.

A real-time example would be any ISO marked Product.ISO gives set of rules/specification on how the product should be build and what minimum set of features it Must have.

This is nothing but subset of properties product Must have.ISO will sign the product only if it satisfies the its standards.

Now take a look at this code

public interface IClock{       //defines a minimum set of specification which a clock should have

    public abstract Date getTime();
    public abstract int getDate();
}
public class Fasttrack: Clock {
    // Must have getTime() and getTime() as it implements IClock
    // It also can have other set of feature like 
    public void startBackgroundLight() {
        // watch with internal light in it.
    }
    .... //Fastrack can support other feature as well
    ....
    ....
}

Here a Fastrack is called as watch because it has all that features that a watch must suppost(Minimum set of features).

Why and When Abstract:

From MSDN:

The purpose of an abstract class is to provide a common definition of a base class that multiple derived classes can share.

For example, a class library may define an abstract class that is used as a parameter to many of its functions, and require programmers using that library to provide their own implementation of the class by creating a derived class. Abstract simply means if you cannot define it completely declare it as an abstract .Implementing class will complete this implementation.

E.g -: Suppose I declare a Class Recipe as abstract but I dont know which recipe to be made.Then I will generalize this class to define the common definition of any recipe.The implantation of recipe will depend on implementing dish.

Abstract class can consist of abstract methods as well as not abstract method So you can notice the difference in Interface.So not necessarily every method your implementing class must have.You only need to override the abstract methods.

In Simple words If you want tight coupling use Interface o/w use in case of lose coupling Abstract Class

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From Design Perspective

Keep it as a Abstract Class if its a "Is a" Relationsship and should do subset/all of the functionality. Keep it as Interface if its a "Should Do" relationship.

From Coding Perspective

Decide what you need , just the policy enforcement - Interfaces

or

code re usability and policy - Abstract Class

Explained here - http://www.buggybread.com/2013/07/java-importance-of-abstract-classes-and.html

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protected by Bo Persson Oct 23 '11 at 18:00

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