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I have a circle image that's fairly large in size to make it easy to resize it smaller or larger depending on where it goes. Its meant to be a background image to a character or two of text.

Basically, in a specific element, wherever the number 1 or 2 appears, I want the circle to appear behind the text, wherever the text happens to be in that element. Mixed in with the text are other images that can just be put in without an issue. I'm sizing them by ems to keep them where they need to go.

So for the sake of making this work as an example/question:

This is the image: http://gumOnShoe.net/NewCard/Frames/Mana/mana_circle.png

So, basically, I need the text to work like this:

This is a paragraph (1) of the text.

Where (1) has the image sized down appropriately with the numeral 1 centered inside of it. the image can be 1.2 em to compensate the text, but I'll size that later. I'm doing this in javascript, but if anyone could help me figure out what the CSS style is going to be I can go with it from there.

Some additional things about the page is that the symbol/text hybrid has to sit within a table cell that's floating to the right of a div, that's relatively positioned, inside of another absolutely positioned div. Not sure if any of that will mess with the display settings, but that's what I'm looking at. Thanks.

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You will want to include the (1) inside of a span that is set to display: inline-block;

This will give the span block element capabilities (set a background-image and width) while still flowing with the text. You can change the background image size by using the property background-size and setting it to the same width of the span.

Check out this JSFiddle.

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with css3 you could probably also do it with setting the background-size to "contain" (I am not 100% sure about this, but I think it should work - at least when you are using a font-family with identical height and width) –  Andrej Sep 30 '11 at 15:18
    
Seems to be the best way to do this short of making images that are done before hand. Thanks, its close to what I've been messing with, but I'm having trouble resizing the text, so I'll try your method and see what it does. –  Brian K. Sep 30 '11 at 15:56
    
Be aware that not all browsers support display: inline-block; Quite a lot of people are still on old versions of IE. –  daiscog Oct 3 '11 at 8:32
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I can only see this working with a mono-space font. Use your image for the background-image of the element containing the text. Get the index of the '1' in the string. Set the background-position to an em value of the index + 1. If there are multiple occurrences, you will have to layer additional absolutely positioned elements below the element containing the text.

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I'm using a font that emulates a real life product and I can't change it or my users will be miffed. A good idea for another project. Thanks though. –  Brian K. Sep 30 '11 at 15:55
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As far as I know, you can't change the size of a background image using CSS. If your image didn't have to be resized dynamically, you could just wrap the number in a <span> with the appropriate background-image and other CSS rules set.

However, the following will work in the latest browsers that support CSS display: inline-block;:

<p>
    Lorem 
    <img 
      src="http://gumOnShoe.net/NewCard/Frames/Mana/mana_circle.png" 
      style="width: 1em; height: 1em;" />
    <span 
      style="margin-left: -1em; 
             width: 1em; 
             display: inline-block; 
             text-align: center;">1</span>
    ipsum.
</p>

Personally, though, I'd create different sized images and use them as background-images for a span around a number. Something like:

<p class="big-text">
    Lorem <span class="number">1</span> ipsum
</p>
<p class="small-text">
    Lorem <span class="number">1</span> ipsum
</p>

... with CSS:

p.big-text span.number {
    background-image: url(/big-circle.png);
}

p.small-text span.number {
    background-image: url(/small-circle.png);
}
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alternatively why not save versions of the image with the number written in the image itself: mana_circle_1.png, mana_circle_2.png, etc, then just add the appropriate one like this: Lorem <img src="mana_circle_1.png" style="height: 1em; width: 1em;" alt="1" /> ipsum... –  daiscog Sep 30 '11 at 15:14
    
User input. Frankly the number could be anything from 0 to 1000. Although I'm probably going to do just 20 so this might be an option. It was the last resort. Also, I need to dynamically resize these images on the fly based on the amount of text that the user has input to keep it inside of a box. Its complicated, so images might actually be the best idea in the long run, but it means more labor upfront to create them and more images on my server. –  Brian K. Sep 30 '11 at 15:53
    
What server-side languages do you have installed? If you have PHP you could use the GD extension to dynamically create the images. –  daiscog Oct 3 '11 at 8:35
    
I'm using PHP, but I went the route of just making the extra 40 images I needed. It seemed like it'd be faster and more reliable across the available browsers. –  Brian K. Oct 3 '11 at 11:56
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Since I cant edit my comment above, I thought of posting it as an answer:

Using css3, you could probably do it like this:

font-family:monospace;
font-size:2em;
padding:5px;
background: url(http://gumonshoe.net/NewCard/Frames/Mana/mana_circle.png) no-repeat center center;
-webkit-background-size: contain;
-moz-background-size: contain;
-o-background-size: contain;
background-size: contain;

checkout the demo: http://jsfiddle.net/gWhqP/

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