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I have just tried to import an Oracle DB to another and it gave an error tells that duplicated values found in a primary key column. Then I checked the source table, and yes really there are duplicate values in PK, and checked PK is enabled and normal. Now I wonder how can this happen.

Edit: I found that index is in unusable state. I don't know how did it happen, just found this: http://asktom.oracle.com/pls/asktom/f?p=100:11:0::::P11_QUESTION_ID:1859798300346695894

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Can you post the table description? –  Wolf Sep 30 '11 at 15:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Assuming your primary key is indeed defined on this column, and enabled, you could check if it is validated. Only validated constraints are guaranteed by Oracle to be true for all rows.

Here's a scenario with an unvalidated primary key with a duplicate value:

SQL> DROP TABLE t;     
Table dropped

SQL> CREATE TABLE t (ID NUMBER);     
Table created

SQL> INSERT INTO t VALUES (1);     
1 row inserted

SQL> INSERT INTO t VALUES (1);     
1 row inserted

SQL> CREATE INDEX t_id_idx ON t(ID);     
Index created

SQL> ALTER TABLE t ADD CONSTRAINT pk_id PRIMARY KEY (ID) NOVALIDATE;     
Table altered

SQL> SELECT * FROM t;

        ID
----------
         1
         1

SQL> SELECT constraint_type, status, validated
  2    FROM user_constraints
  3   WHERE constraint_name = 'PK_ID';

CONSTRAINT_TYPE STATUS   VALIDATED
--------------- -------- -------------
P               ENABLED  NOT VALIDATED

Update:

One likely explanation is that a direct path load (from SQL*Loader) left your unique index in an unusable state with duplicate primary keys.

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A column that you think pk is applied but in reality its your mistake. PK is not defined on that column...

Or

You have applied Composite/Multi column primary key.. Try to insert same record twice it shows error that means composite key..

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just now I rechecked, its just one column primary key. there is a unique index and there is a PK constraint. –  Kemalettin Erbakırcı Sep 30 '11 at 15:06

Check to see that you have the index setup as unique.

select table_name,uniqueness,index_name from all_indexes where table_name='[table_name]';


/* shows you the columns that make up the index */
select * from all_ind_columns where index_name='[index_name]';
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I checked, it's unique and one column. but I found that it's in unusable state. but why is it unusable! and the table has exactly double records for each record needed. –  Kemalettin Erbakırcı Sep 30 '11 at 15:11

You had inserted data twice

OR

The destination table is not empty.

OR

You defined a different pk on dest table.

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Potentially the constraints were disabled to load data and then the same load has been run again- could be the index now won't validate because of the double data in the table.

Has there been a data load recently ? Does the table have any audit columns eg create date to determine if all rowa are duplicate ?

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Using deferred constraints can cause duplicate values to be inserted into a PK column.

Check the link below. It describes a possible Oracle bug that can lead to duplicated primary key values. I just recreated the issue on Oracle 11g EE Rel 11.2.0.2.0

http://www.pythian.com/news/9881/deferrable-constraints-in-oracle-11gr2-may-lead-to-logically-corrupted-data/

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