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I've been reading about inheritance but I still dont have it 100% clear, here goes my question: I have for example a class full of stuff:

class Something
{
  public:
    Something();
    Something(int A);
    Something(Something S);
    ~Something();

    Something& operator=(const Something & s);
    Something operator+(const Something & s) const;
    // more methods ...
  protected:
    int A,B,C;
}

All methods implemented somewhere, and now I just want a new class to add one more attribute and maybe one method, but I still want the same behavior as the SuperClass (constructor, destructor, methods, operators), so I do something like this:

class SomethingMore : public Something
{
  public:
    void OnlyMethodHere();
  private:
    int D;
}

But I get something like:

undefined reference to SomethingMore::SomethingMore(int)

Is there a ay to tell the compiler to use everything just like it is in the SuperClass or do I have to make a SuperClass::method() in every child's method?

share|improve this question
    
Another observation w.r.t to the code : use virtual destructor above, since the class has virtual methods. –  vine'th Sep 30 '11 at 16:19
    
@vine'th: I don't see any virtual functions here. –  Mike Seymour Sep 30 '11 at 16:20
    
btw, Something(Something S); is wrong. I wonder if it compiles. Even if it compiles, the program will crash due to StackOverflow! :) –  balki Sep 30 '11 at 16:25
1  
@vine'th Virtual destructor are needed only if you want / need polymorphic deletion. This has nothing to do with how many other methods are or not polymorphic. Polymorphism is not necessarily an ALL or NOTHING issue. –  Emilio Garavaglia Sep 30 '11 at 16:27
    
@Mike Seymour: I think I should get my eyes tested :) I think I carry fwded the virtual keyword here I had seen in a earlier question. thanks for pointing out anyway. –  vine'th Oct 1 '11 at 6:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You don't have to repeat for methods. but for constructor, you have to define them properly in the sub class. Anyway the code is boiler plate unless you have anything extra.

SomethingMore::SomethingMore(int i_):Something(i_)
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
for each constructor? –  juliomalegria Sep 30 '11 at 16:20
2  
The compiler will generate the default constructor and copy constructor for you. But you have one that takes an int which it doesn't know how to generate. Hence the undefined reference. So I believe you just need to define that particular constructor. –  Robb Sep 30 '11 at 16:21
    
I'm getting and undefined reference to ... for every method in the SuperClass not mentioned in the SubClass, in this case: the constructor, destructor, operator=, operator+. I dont think is just a problem with the constructor. –  juliomalegria Sep 30 '11 at 16:28
    
Did you define those methods? I mean write the code for the methods? Can you post the complete code in ideone.com ? –  balki Sep 30 '11 at 16:41

You can obtain the same effect as in this answer, in C++0x with a sort of catch-all constructor:

class SomethingMore
{
public:
    .......
    template<class... Args>
    SomethingMore(Args&&... args) : Something(std::forward<Args>(args...)) {}
}
share|improve this answer

In c++0x it is possible to do by:

class BaseClass
{
public:
  BaseClass(int iValue);
};

class DerivedClass : public BaseClass
{
public:
  using default BaseClass;
};

, but i don't know of any compiler that supports it by now. If you want to keep compatible with older compilers you have to repeat all constructors in derived class like

class BaseClass
{
public:
  BaseClass(int iValue);
};

class  : public BaseClass
{
public:
  DerivedClass(int iValue):BaseClass(iValue){}
};
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, now we're good with the constructor, but I'm still getting a undefined reference to ... for everything else (destructor, and all the other methods). –  juliomalegria Sep 30 '11 at 16:32
    
What exatly is error message? if it is Something::operator=, then it means that linker dosn not see where you have implemented those methods - are you sure they are correclty implemented and added into build tree? –  j_kubik Sep 30 '11 at 16:59

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