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Given the code below,

import java.util.Date;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public enum SearchDataTypes {

  FIELD_DATATYPE_TEXT(String.class,"_t"),
  FIELD_DATATYPE_INT(Integer.class,"_i"),
  FIELD_DATATYPE_LONG(Long.class,"_l"),
  FIELD_DATATYPE_FLOAT(Float.class,"_f"),
  FIELD_DATATYPE_DOUBLE(Double.class, "_d" ),
  FIELD_DATATYPE_DATE(Date.class,"_dt");

  SearchDataTypes(final Class<?> clazz, final String affix) {
    this.affix = affix;
    this.clazz = clazz;
    getAffixMap().put(affix, this);
    getClassMap().put(clazz, this);
  }

  public String getFieldName(String objectFieldName) {
    return objectFieldName+affix;
  }

  public String getObjectFieldName(String FieldName) {
    int len = FieldName.length();
    len -= this.affix.length();
    return FieldName.substring(0, len);
  }
  public static SearchDataTypes findByAffix(String affix) {
    SearchDataTypes obj = getAffixMap().get(affix);
    assert obj != null;
    return obj;
  }

  public static SearchDataTypes findByClass(Class<?> clazz) {
    SearchDataTypes obj = getClassMap().get(clazz);
    assert obj != null;
    return obj;
  }

  private String affix;
  private Class<?> clazz;

  private static Map<Class<?>, SearchDataTypes> classMap = new HashMap<Class<?>, SearchDataTypes>();
  private static Map<String, SearchDataTypes> affixMap = new HashMap<String, SearchDataTypes>();

  private static Map<Class<?>, SearchDataTypes> getClassMap() { return classMap; }
  private static Map<String, SearchDataTypes> getAffixMap() { return affixMap; }


}

The enum class is not getting instantiated (using the enum throws NoClassDefFoundError) because the there is NullPointerException during initialization. I assume that the JVM is thinking either map is null. But why??

How else can I implement a finder for enums? I prefer not to use java.util.EnumMap class mainly because I want to better understand the innerworking of enums.

thank you

share|improve this question
    
What is the actual backtrace of the NPE? You need to debug it. –  bmargulies Sep 30 '11 at 17:51
    
If I can see the NPE, I wouldn't post this. The NPE is not getting printed by the JVM. –  jabawaba Sep 30 '11 at 17:55
    
I don't think enum supports static map fields. But there must be an alternative to what I'm trying to do. –  jabawaba Sep 30 '11 at 17:56
    
you have to use a debugger. –  bmargulies Sep 30 '11 at 17:57
    
Yes. Since the class is not getting instantiated, I can not go into the class. –  jabawaba Sep 30 '11 at 17:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Think of the enum constants as public static final members of the Java class. Like all static members, they are initialized in source order. So the constants are being initialized before the maps, thus you'll get the null pointer exception when referencing the map in the constructors, because the map hasn't been initialized yet.

Though not possible with java syntax, the simple solution would be to declare the maps before the enums--but since that's not possible, the next best thing is to just initialize the maps in a static block after the constants: e.g.

public enum SearchDataTypes {
    ...
    FIELD_DATATYPE_DATE(Date.class,"_dt");

    private static final Map<String,SearchDataTypes> affixMap = new HashMap<String,SearchDataType>();
    private static final Map<Class<?>, SearchDataTypes> classMap = new HashMap<Class<?>, SearchDataTypes>()
    static {
        for (SearchDataType value : values()) {
            map.put(value.affix, value);
            map.put(value.clazz, value);
        }
    }

    SearchDataTypes(final Class<?> clazz, final String affix) {
        this.affix = affix;
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
I found myself doing this so often that I built a generic helper class and annotation to do it for me: riversoforion.git.sourceforge.net/git/… –  Mac Sep 30 '11 at 18:06

The instances are getting constructed before the static initialization of the rest of the enum. Use "getters" for the maps that will construct them if they are null.

Because it's all happening within static initialization of the enum class, it's intrinsically thread-safe - you don't have to use a synchronize block.

share|improve this answer
    
That is a good solution and I had tried it. One obstacle I encountered was to wrap the instantiation of the map (if null) in a synchronized block. However, I didn't have a 'common' object monitor to sync on. I do realize the probability of two threads hitting the getter at the same time is remote but I always prefer my classes to be threadsafe. –  jabawaba Sep 30 '11 at 18:30
    
@jabawaba - Because it's all happening within static initialization of the enum class, it's intrinsically thread-safe. –  Ed Staub Sep 30 '11 at 19:34

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