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I have code that compiles on GNUARM compiler, but Visual Studio 2010 issues errors. The issue involves declaring variables after the first statement in a C language file:

main.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main(void)
{
  int i = 6;
  i = i + 1;
  printf("Value of i is: %d\n", i);
  int j = i * 10; // <-- This is what Visual Studio 2010 complains about.
  printf("Value of j is: %d\n", j);
  return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

The following code compiles without errors:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main(void)
{
  int i = 6;
  int j;      // <-- Declaration is now here, valid according to K&R rules.
  i = i + 1;
  printf("Value of i is: %d\n", i);
  j = i * 10; // <-- Moved declaration of j to above.
  printf("Value of j is: %d\n", j);
  return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

I'm using default settings for creating a Win32 console project. When I set "Compile as" property to "Compile as C++ (/TP)", I get compilation errors in some Visual Studio header files. (Right click on project, choose Properties --> Configuration Properties --> C/C++ --> Advanced)

How do I tell Visual Studio 2010 to allow variable declarations after the first statement, like C++ or the current C language standard?

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When you compile with /TP, what are the "compilation errors in some Visual Studio header files"? I get no errors when compiling your example with /TP. –  James McNellis Sep 30 '11 at 18:23
1  
Embarrassingly, you can't. stackoverflow.com/questions/146381/… –  James Greenhalgh Sep 30 '11 at 18:25
    
I rebuilt the {embedded} code as C++ (/TP) and also as C (/TC). No errors in the Visual Studio header files. Weird. –  Thomas Matthews Sep 30 '11 at 18:35
    
@JamesGreenhalgh: Thanks for the reference. –  Thomas Matthews Sep 30 '11 at 18:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You don't. Visual C++ does not support C99.

You'll need to compile as C++ (and update your code accordingly) or follow the rules of C89.

(I don't know what errors you get when compiling with /TP; I can compile your example successfully with /TP if I add #include <stdlib.h> for EXIT_SUCCESS; if you provide more details, I or someone else may be able to help.)

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I made the same test with the default Visual Studio 2010 project, with the C file and /TP switch, and got the precompiled headers error. It can be removed by renaming stdafx.cpp to stdafx.c, or disabling precompiled headers for the whole project or for specific C files.

I didn't find any other problems. However, this effectively converts C language to C++, which is not your intention, I think. C allows, however, to define a variable in the beginning of every {} block.

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Yes, the C language allows add {} blocks to declare temporary variables. However, my legacy embedded C code uses the C99 language standard. –  Thomas Matthews Sep 30 '11 at 18:38

As of VS13, the Visual C++ compiler supports C99 style variable declarations. More details can be found here:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2013/06/28/c-11-14-stl-features-fixes-and-breaking-changes-in-vs-2013.aspx

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I'm stuck with VS2010 at the shop and presently, they can't justify upgrading the tools to VS2013. I want them to upgrade because MS finally became C99 compatible in VS2013. All our other compilers are compliant. Sharing files between the compilers is frustrating. –  Thomas Matthews Aug 14 '14 at 23:52

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