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I am trying to understand how to read information form an input file and write that data into an output file. I understand how to read from a file and dispaly its contents, but I DONT understand how to write to a file or display its contents. My program runs fine but when I check my output txt file, there is nothing in it! What could I be doing wrong? input file contains 3.1415 2.718 1.414.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
float fValue;
fstream inputFile;
ofstream outputFile;

inputFile.open("C:\\Users\\David\\Desktop\\inputFile.txt");
outputFile.open("C:\\Users\\David\\Desktop\\outputfile.txt");

cout << fixed << showpoint;
cout << setprecision(3);
cout << "Items in input-file:\t " << "Items in out-put File: " << endl;

inputFile >> fValue;    // gets the fiest value from the input

while (inputFile) // single loop that reads(from inputfile) and writes(to outputfile)    each number at a time.
{
    cout << fValue << endl; // simply prints the numbers for checking.
    outputFile << fValue << ", "; // writes to the output as it reads numbers from the input.
    inputFile >> fValue; // checks next input value in the file
}



outputFile.close();
inputFile.close();


int pause;
cin >> pause;

return 0;
}
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1  
That code looks wrong, since you have cout << fValue twice without a inputFile >> fValue between. I would bet the file failed to open –  Mooing Duck Sep 30 '11 at 18:24
1  
You forgot to check error code after opening a file! :) It doesn't always succeed! –  user405725 Sep 30 '11 at 18:30
    
Your code "works" for me (it writes the first value twice). –  jrok Sep 30 '11 at 18:33

4 Answers 4

On windows, it's likely that you have the output file open with something like notepad and your C++ program is not opening the file for output. The ofstream::open function will silently fail. You need to check the status of outputFile after you attempt to open it. Something like

outputFile.open("C:\\Users\\David\\Desktop\\outputfile.txt");
if (!outputFile) {
  cerr << "can't open output file" << endl;
}

If the status of outputFile is not ok, then you can do

outputfile << "foobar";

and

outputfile.flush();

till the cow's come home and you still won't get any output.

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This seems likely to me. I tried the code (on Linux/GCC) and it works just fine. –  Mac Sep 30 '11 at 18:33

You need to close the output file for the buffer to be flushed to the file prior to your application exiting.

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1  
The destructor of ofstream should do that for you. –  Doug T. Sep 30 '11 at 18:21
    
... unless the asker is looking at the file just where the code pauses... –  user405725 Sep 30 '11 at 18:32
    
adding the close() WORKED it did the trick and my program wrote to the txt file. Now I just need to display that data from output to my screen. –  DEdesigns57 Sep 30 '11 at 19:22
1  
@VladLazarenko, AaronN: I didn't think about the implications of int pause; cin >> pause; You're right. –  Mooing Duck Sep 30 '11 at 19:51
    
@DEdesigns57: Instead of closing the file, you can also just use outputFile.flush() or outputFile << endl; (endl forces a flush, as does closing) –  Mooing Duck Sep 30 '11 at 19:54

The code looks like it should save something to the file. The logic is all wrong, but something ought to be there. Check the states of your streams.

cout << fixed << showpoint;
cout << setprecision(3);
cout << "Items in input-file:\t " << "outputFile: " << endl;

while (inputFile >> fValue) 
{
    cout << fValue << endl; // this confirms that the above code read from my text file.
    outputFile << fValue << '\n'
    if (!outputFile) {
        cout << "Error saving to file.\n";
        break;
    }
}
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I have put some comments to explain my logic, where is my thinking worng exactly? –  DEdesigns57 Sep 30 '11 at 18:49
    
Ah, the code was changed. The logic is good now, except you still don't check the state of the output stream. –  Mooing Duck Sep 30 '11 at 19:52

As David N. mentioned, fstreams do not throw by default when the file fails to open, or the stream gets into a bad state at some point during writing. You can make them throw on error by setting the ofstream::exceptions flag to 'ofstream::failbit | ofstream::badbit'. You can find more information about the exception mask here:

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/iostream/ios/exceptions/

It is good practice to set the exception mask for failure, because a) it avoids race conditions and b) requires errors to be dealt with and c) allows automatic stack unwinding which is often convenient in larger programs.

Secondly, in this loop:

while (inputFile) 
{
...
}

The condition that you should be checking is inputFile.eof(). However, I would suggest that you do this "The C++ Way":

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <iomanip>  
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
  float fValue;
  ifstream inputFile;
  ofstream outputFile;

  inputFile.open("input");  
  outputFile.open("output");

  // EDIT: this is optional, but recommended
  inputFile.exceptions(ifstream::badbit | ifstream::failbit);
  outputFile.exceptions(ofstream::badbit | ofstream::failbit);

  copy(istream_iterator<double>(inputFile)
       , istream_iterator<double>()
       , ostream_iterator<double>(outputFile, ", "));

  /*
  // EDIT: you can also check the status manually, but it looks more like C code:
  if(inputFile.bad() || outputFile.bad())
     return 1;
  */

  outputFile.close();
  inputFile.close();

  cin.ignore();

  return 0;

}

Notice the use of iterators and the std::copy() algorithm rather than reading directly from the stream. If you want to print out the contents of a file directly to std::cout, then you can do this:

copy(istream_iterator<char>(file), istream_iterator<char>(), ostream_iterator<char>(cout));

Note that by default istream_iterators will skip whitespace, so you have to set file >> noskipws in order to prevent this.

HTH!

Gred

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