Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to understand how Properties work. I've found that stepping though sample code can be very helpful. But When I step through a small program with a simple class and Property, the Property never gets hit. Which makes me wonder if its even being used. With the code below I can see that the private variables of the class are touched but nothing else. I'm confused. Plus if anyone has found a site or video that was their "ah hah" moment for understanding class properties I'd love to see it.

using System;

public class Customer
{
    private int m_id = -1;

    public int ID
    {
        get
        {
            return m_id;
        }
        set
        {
            m_id = value;
        }
    }

    private string m_name = string.Empty;

    public string Name
    {
        get
        {
            return m_name;
        }
        set
        {
            m_name = value;
        }
    }
}

public class CustomerManagerWithProperties
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        Customer cust = new Customer();

        cust.ID = 1;
        cust.Name = "Amelio Rosales";

        Console.WriteLine(
                "ID: {0}, Name: {1}",
                cust.ID,
                cust.Name);

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
What version of Visula Studio are you using? –  JaredPar Sep 30 '11 at 18:24
    
I'm using Visual Studio 2010. –  JimDel Sep 30 '11 at 18:33
    
Plus if anyone has found a site or video that was their "ah hah" moment for understanding class properties I'd love to see it. Class properties are public variables. What is your exact question about class properties? –  Ramhound Sep 30 '11 at 18:45
    
properties are equivalent to "getters" and "setters" in Java and other languages. Just that they're a little more formal. It's like exposing a field except that they can be calculated or just have a get or just a set. It's a way to expose values without violating the principals of encapsulation purported by object oriented design. –  justin.m.chase Sep 30 '11 at 19:22
    
And the reason why they're stepped over by default in C# is just because they're usually just getting a field and therefore not very interesting. In addition to just turning off this feature you can also right click on a given line of code during debugging and select "Step Into..." and you can explicitly step into a part of an expression in that line, including properties. –  justin.m.chase Sep 30 '11 at 19:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You have to modify the default debugger settings to step into properties (Tools|Options ->Debugging->General):

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
Beat me to it, with a screenshot none-the-less! –  CodingGorilla Sep 30 '11 at 18:27
    
Awesome! thank you! –  JimDel Sep 30 '11 at 18:34

You should check your settings in Visual Studio, in: Tools -> Options -> Debugging, there is the option:

Step over properties and operators (Managed only)

Make sure this is unchecked.

share|improve this answer

In Visual Studio 2010, the default is to step over properties. You can change this behavior in the Tools -> Options -> General -> Step over properties and operators (Managed only).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.