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I have a standard ASP.NET GridView and I'd like the first column (a emplateField) to be rendered as <th>, or in ASP.NET terms, I'd like to set it to the GridView RowHeaderColumn property. But that property is looking for the name of a DataItem (from a BoundColumn).

How can I render my TemplateField with <th> tags?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Finally found a workaround for this. I am not sure if this code has anything to do with good ASP.NET practices, but it does the trick:

public class FirstColumnHeaderGridView : GridView
{
    protected override void InitializeRow(GridViewRow row, DataControlField[] fields)
    {
        DataControlFieldCell cell = new DataControlFieldHeaderCell(fields[0]);
        DataControlCellType header = DataControlCellType.DataCell;

        fields[0].InitializeCell(cell, header, row.RowState, row.RowIndex);
        row.Cells.Add(cell);


        DataControlField[] newFields = new DataControlField[fields.Length - 1];
        for (int i = 1; i < fields.Length; i++)
        {
            newFields[i - 1] = fields[i];
        }

        base.InitializeRow(row, newFields);
    }
}

Let me explain what is going on here. We are creating a special type of GridView, that will render its first column using <th> tags no matter how this column is created. For this we are overriding the InitializeRow method. This method basically configures cells for the row. We are handling the first cell, and let standard GridView take care of the rest.

The configuration we are applying to the cell is fully taken from the GridView implementation and is enough for the cell to be rendered with <th> tag instead of <td>.

After that workaround the usage is absolutely standard - register our class as a server control and use it as usual GridView:

<%@ Register Assembly="WebApplication1" Namespace="WebApplication1" TagPrefix="wa1" %>
...
<wa1:FirstColumnHeaderGridView ID="Grid1" runat="server" ...>
    <Columns>
        <asp:TemplateField>
            <ItemTemplate>
                Will be inside th
            </ItemTemplate>
        </asp:TemplateField>
        <asp:TemplateField>
            <ItemTemplate>
                Will be inside td
            </ItemTemplate>
        </asp:TemplateField>
    </Columns>
</wa1:FirstColumnHeaderGridView>
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Wow. I'm impressed! Great workaround! I actually diverted my efforts and cut apart some javascript that was reading my grid and played that angle. However, I tried your code, and it worked! Thanks for your help. –  Honus Wagner Oct 3 '11 at 20:52

Is this what you mean?

<Columns>
   <asp:TemplateField HeaderText="Código" ItemStyle-Width="9%">
      <HeaderTemplate>
          <asp:Label runat="server" Text="CodigoSAP"></asp:Label>
      </HeaderTemplate>
      <ItemTemplate>
          <asp:Label runat="server" ID="lblCodigoSAP" Text='<%# Bind("CodigoSAP") %>'>                  </asp:Label>
      </ItemTemplate>                                    
   </asp:TemplateField>

I'm almost sure I'm getting the wrong idea, what do you say?

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No, that is not what I mean. Please see this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Honus Wagner Sep 30 '11 at 20:02
    
There is a note in that article: This property works only with bound fields. It does not work with template fields. –  daniloquio Sep 30 '11 at 20:06
    
Definetively you can not do it with a templatefield. Do you need it to render as th or you just want it to look like a th? –  daniloquio Sep 30 '11 at 20:11
    
I saw that. Hoping there was a way around. –  Honus Wagner Sep 30 '11 at 20:12

Late to the game, but we needed to set scope="row" in a middle column, not the first. To make it generic, in a derived GridView class I added the following property (similar to the GridView's built-in RowHeaderColumn property):

public int? RowHeaderColumnIndex
{
    get { return (int?)ViewState["RowHeaderColumnIndex"]; }
    set { ViewState["RowHeaderColumnIndex"] = value; }
}

Then set the scope:

protected override void OnRowCreated(GridViewRowEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.Row.RowType == DataControlRowType.DataRow && RowHeaderColumnIndex.HasValue)
    {
        e.Row.Cells[RowHeaderColumnIndex.Value].Attributes["scope"] = "row";
    }
}

When you place your custom grid just set RowHeaderColumnIndex="0" for the first column, "1" for the 2nd column and so on.

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