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Can this be done for the code below. Problem I see is that there are two statements in the else clause and I couldn't figure out a way to fit in the echo...I need to return a 1 or a 0. Perhaps someone knows a trick?

  function empty_user($c)    
    {
    if((int)!in_array('',$this->a,TRUE)) 
      {
      return 1;
      }
     else
      {
      echo $c;
      return 0;
      } 
    }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No ternary =/. Although you can simplify this a lot because once the function returns, it stops interpreting the function anyway, so you can eliminate the else.

function empty_user($c) {
    if ((int)!in_array('',$this->a,TRUE)) return 1;
    echo $c;
    return 0;
}
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Thank you...very nice....you mean interpreting not parsing i think. –  user656925 Sep 30 '11 at 19:48
    
Ooh, you're right! –  Korvin Szanto Sep 30 '11 at 19:54

you generally shouldn't use ternary operators to determine execution order, but also, no, you won't be able to convert the if/else you've got there.

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You can't use a ternary operator if you want more than one operation in either block, but the question is why would you want to? It is much clearer and easier to update if you have full blocks that you can continue to add code to.

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I'm not adding code currently..I am optimizing for readability and conciseness. –  user656925 Sep 30 '11 at 19:40
1  
@ChrisAaker It's debatable which is more readable. The ternary operator is only slightly more concise, though. –  Explosion Pills Sep 30 '11 at 19:57

in_array returns a bool which is perfect for an if statement - there is no need to cast it to an int.

    function empty_user($c)    
    {
       if (in_array('',$this->a,TRUE))
       {
          echo $c;
          return 0;
       }

       return 1;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
i'm casting to an int for consistency with other functions used in an && statement like this: f1() && f2() && f3() –  user656925 Sep 30 '11 at 20:02

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